Updates on 5G NR and mmWave Measurements and 5G lab tour 🗓

— Two presentations and a demo.

Paste into Location field: Society Initials or IEEE committee (city)
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Meeting Date: May 21, 2019
Time: 5:30 PM Networking & Food; 6:16 PM Program starts

Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Presentation 1: Testing the 5G New Radio
By Dr. Michael Foegelle, ETS-Lindgren, Cedar Park, Texas

Presentation 2: RFIC/Silicon-based Phased Arrays and Transceivers for 5G
By Prof. Gabriel Rebeiz, UCSD

Demonstration: Following the presentation, attendees will have a chance to see the engineering lab where Prof. Rebeiz and his students conduct pioneering R&D on phased arrays and transceivers for 5G. Attendees can witness a test set up to evaluate the real-world performance of these devices.

Cyber-Attack and Smart Grid 🗓

— cyber-power test bed for testing cyber attacks on a power system

Co-sponsored by IEEE Foothill Section, Computer Society chapter, PES chapter, IEEE@CPP, PES@CPP
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Meeting Date: April 30, 2019
Time: 12 noon Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Sean Monemi, Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Founder of Smart Grid Laboratory at California State Polytechnic University
Location: Pomona, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: We created a flexible test bed that will allow for penetration testing to be done within a power system environment. Cyber-attacks, poses new threats and issues for modern day power systems. In order to understand those threats, a cyber-power test bed must be developed for testing cyber attacks on a power system and along with its crucial components and data. The cyber-power test bed in development will include the RTDS machine for simulating the power system, a computer with a virtual machine that will simulate the power system via RSCAD, an SQL database to store the important data for the power system that is streamed via OpenPDC, an attacking computer with a virtual machine containing common hacking tools, and a network switch to place all virtual and real machines on the same network for an isolated testing environment.

Bio: Dr. Sean Monemi is a Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Founder of Smart Grid Laboratory at California State Polytechnic University (Cal Poly Pomona). He has over 30 years of industry and academic experience. Prior to Cal Poly Pomona, he served as a faculty member, senior research associate and research scientist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

Dr. Monemi’s research areas covers: Smart Grid Technologies, Renewable Energy, Model Integrated Computing, Simulation and Diagnostics of Power Grid, and Fault Management Analysis in Power Systems. He has received several research grants to support his research work from: Department Of Energy (DOE), National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, Microsoft, ETAP, SKM and JWEMC. He has several publications and he is a member of IEEE, ASEE, ASME, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Xi. Dr. Monemi received his Ph.D. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Vanderbilt University, and his B.S in Electrical Engineering from Alabama A&M University.

Monte Carlo Denoising 🗓

— First-hand account of the MC Denoising revolution

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Meeting Date: April 17, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Pradeep Sen Ph.D. UCSB ECE MIRAGE LAB
Location: Goleta, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: Monte Carlo (MC) path-tracing is now the most common rendering algorithm used for anything from architectural visualization to feature film production. These systems produce photorealistic images by simulating the physical flow of light through all paths in the scene. However, if too few light paths are computed, the resulting images are filled with objectionable noise. Although this made MC rendering impractical for over two decades, everything changed with the advent of high-quality MC denoising, which enabled the use of path tracing for major feature films such as Disney’s “Big Hero 6” and Pixar’s “Coco”.

In this talk, we will present a first-hand account of the MC denoising revolution that has unfolded over the past decade and describe the key innovations that made it possible. These include ideas such as outputting additional features computed at render time (e.g., sample positions, surface normals, and texture values) to make the denoiser more robust. At the same time, the denoiser had to figure out how to adjust how these features were used from pixel to pixel in order to remove the noise but preserve the scene detail, which can also look “noisy”. We also discuss the new generation of learning-based MC denoising which is now producing state-of-the-art results that are good enough even for “final frame” output.

Although MC denoising has been credited as being one of two key “enabling technologies” that brought path-tracing to feature film production, the journey is far from over. We conclude the talk by discussing future directions for MC denoising, and describe how it fits among the pantheon of tools available for MC variance reduction.

Bio: Pradeep Sen is an Associate Professor in the UCSB MIRAGE Lab in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He attended Purdue University from 1992 – 1996, where he graduated with a B.S. in Computer and Electrical Engineering. He then attended Stanford University where he received his M.S. in Electrical Engineering in 1998 in the area of electron-beam lithography. In 2000, he joined the Stanford Graphics Lab where he did research on real-time rendering and computational photography. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in June 2006, advised by Dr. Pat Hanrahan. His research interests include algorithms for image synthesis, computational image processing, and computational photography, and he is a co-author of over 50 technical publications, including more than ten SIGGRAPH/SIGGRAPH Asia/ToG publications. Dr. Sen has been awarded more than $2.2 million in research funding, including an NSF CAREER award in 2009.

Language Independent Software Architecture Recovery 🗓

— Recover and RELAX: Concern-Oriented Software Architecture Recovery

IEEE OC Computer Society
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Meeting Date: April 22, 2019
Time: 6:15 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Daniel Link
Location: Knobbe Martens’ Irvine offices
Cost: (not free) Subway sandwiches, Chips and Soda.
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: A more complete title for this talk would be “Recover and RELAX: Concern-Oriented Software Architecture Recovery for Systems Development and Maintenance”, but while correct, it is too long.

The stakeholders of a system are interested in how its architecture reflects their concerns at each point of its life-cycle. Having such knowledge available at all times would enable them to continually adjust their systems’ structure and reduce the buildup of technical debt. In the usual case, this (actual) architecture is unavailable: architecture recovery provides a way to recover an architectural view of the system. Many different methods and tools exist to provide such a view.

This talk will touch on the architectural recovery methods proposed by researchers but focus on concern-oriented approaches. The design choices forming the bases of most existing recovery methods mean that none of them have a complete set of desirable qualities for the purposes of development/enhancement or maintenance. Tailoring a recovery to a system is either not possible or only through iterative experiments with numeric parameters. Furthermore, limitations in their scalability make it prohibitive to apply the existing techniques to large systems. Finally, since several current recovery methods employ non-deterministic sampling, their inconsistent results do not lend themselves well to tracking a systems course over several versions.

After looking at a few case studies of common methods, we introduce RELAX (RELiable Architecture EXtraction), our new concern-based recovery method that uses text classification, addresses these issues efficiently by (1) assembling the overall recovery result from smaller, independent parts, (2) basing it on an algorithm with linear time complexity and (3) being tailorable to the recovery of a single system or a sequence thereof through the selection of meaningfully named, semantic topics. An intuitive, informative architectural visualization rounds out RELAX’s contributions. RELAX is illustrated on a number of existing open-source systems and compared to other recovery methods. A tool demo will be part of the presentation.

Bio: Daniel Link
After six years in industry, Daniel Link became a Ph.D Student at the USC Viterbi Computer Science Department and a Research Assistant at the USC Center for Systems and Software Engineering (CSSE). His research interests and publications cover Software Architecture Recovery and Cost Estimation as well as related tools. His six years of industry experience included working for popular media production companies and other areas.

Product Safety Meeting Field Evaluation Bodies (FEBs), Nationally Recognized Test Labs (NRTLs), and the NEC. 🗓

— The relationship between FEBs and NRTLs

Paste into Location field: Society Initials or IEEE committee (city)
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Meeting Date: April 9, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Phil Meadow of Nemko USA
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: The relationship between FEBs and NRTLs, the basics of the two field evaluation standards, NFPA 790 and 791, NEC labeling requirements, and common issues found during the field evaluation process.

Bio: Phil Meadow has more than twenty years experience in the NRTL and FEB arena. Experience began with AGA Laboratories, and continued with CSA Group, eti Conformity Services, and is presently employed as the Field Evaluation Program Manager for Nemko USA. Educational background includes a bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois in Urbana/Champaign, and a MBA from Pepperdine University.

Phil’s career initially started with a division of ITW, and one of his manufacturing specialties was working to customize appliances for key accounts; before being recruited into the safety world.

Consultants Network – “A Review of Basics of US Patent Law: What is the law regarding patentable subject matter” 🗓

— A must-see presentation for anyone that works in a technology field

IEEE San Diego Section Consultants Network
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Meeting Date: (day / date) 2019
Time: 6:00 – 7:00 pm – Dinner and informal networking; 7:00 – 8:30 pm – Meeting
Speaker: Bruce Greenhaus
Location: San Diego
Cost:
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: This presentation is intended to provide a primer on US patent law for Engineers and Inventors. In particular, this presentation provides important information regarding the changing landscape regarding what is currently considered eligible for patent protection. In addition, information will be presented, and questions answered regarding applying for patent protection. This is a must-see presentation for anyone that works in a technology field and that has asked, “can I patent this?”

Bio: Bruce Greenhaus is an intellectual property attorney for over 27 years, I have had the opportunity to work with and represent some of the best technology companies in the world. I was Vice President, Patent Counsel for Qualcomm, Inc. for 10 years, and more recently Vice President, Chief Patent Counsel for Entropic Communications, Inc., a midsize public corporation. I have been an adjunct professor of law with Thomas Jefferson School of Law since 2003. I have worked in both large and midsized firms. I have served as the president of the San Diego Intellectual Property Law Association (SDIPLA) and was on the board of directors of SDIPLA for four years. In addition, I served on the board of the San Diego Volunteer Lawyer Program.

IEEE OC Section ExCom Meeting 🗓

All invited, add your ideas, volunteer at the next level

register
Meeting Date: April 11, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation

Location: ATEP IVC Tustin
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: All IEEE OC Committee/Chapter/Affinity/SIG Chair/Key Volunteers (or their proxy) are requested to attend

Futures In Engineering Conference 🗓

Company demos, Guest Speakers, and student project demonstrations

IEEE Foothill Section and IEEE Student Branch
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Meeting Date: April 13, 2019
Time: 10AM Registration; Speaker Introduction 10:30AM: Q&A 11:20AM
Speaker: Dr. Lorenzo of Telephonics Corporation
Topic: Radar, the Invention that Changed the World
Location: Cal State University San Bernardino
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: A one day event at CSUSB focusing on current and future trends in technology. Featuring Company demos, Guest Speakers, and student project demonstrations. This event is hosted by the Computer Science & Engineering (CSE) Club, the IEEE Student Branch, ACM Student Chapter at CSUSB and the IEEE Foothill branch MTTS/APS Society.

Featured talk summary: Aerospace Electronic Systems, and in particular Radar and Electronic Warfare (EW), are one of the most active yet unappreciated fields in the Electrical Engineering community. The IEEE AESS members account for only 1% of the IEEE total, yet the AES market is estimated to be in the range of hundreds of billions of dollars. Radar and EW applications are typically unheard by the general public, yet they are the backbone of any military force worldwide, providing defense, security, and peace. The history of radar and EW is also intriguing: Robert Buderi considered radar as “the invention that changed the world,” while General Patterson though that radars were the real reason why the Allied forces defeated the Axis powers. This talk will introduce you to the captivating history of radar/EW, leading to the most recent radar/EW systems worldwide and their applications, both civilian and military ones. The talk will show you what radars can do for the society and what the AES industry is looking for, in particular from young engineers. The talk will end with an overview of the IEEE AESS, its benefits to the members, and in particular to students and young professionals.
Speaker Bio: Dr. Lo Monte has comprehensive experience in applied Radar, RF, DSP, EW system design and prototyping, from small companies, consulting, academia, research institutions, to large defense contractors and government agencies worldwide. He serves as Chief Scientist at Telephonics, a top-100 defense corporation specializing in ISR, with the role of translating research innovations into commercial products. Prior to that, he was an Associate Professor at the University of Dayton, where he created the courses “Intro to Radar,” “Radar/RF Systems Design,” and “Intro to Electronic Warfare.” He was also the Director of the Mumma Radar Laboratory. Dr. Lo Monte has published over 70 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers and two book chapters.

Throughout his career, he gained experience in HF-to-W Band radar systems prototyping, including monopulse, radar transmitters, early-warning radars, multistatic and MIMO radar, ISAR and tomography, GPR, passive HF/VHF/UHF systems, IED/EFP detection, ballistic missile defense radar, resonance exploitation, RF/IR integration, DRFM, EA/EP/ES, AMTI/GMTI/MMTI, clutter modeling and study, antenna/microwave design and measurements, instrumentation control, computational electromagnetics, inverse scattering, DSP, electrical/mechanical CAD design.

Dr. Lo Monte is very active in the IEEE community, serving in the AESS Board of Governors as the VP for Education. Dr. Lo Monte is also the Topical Editor of the IEEE Sensors Journal for “Radiation Sensors.” Dr. Lo Monte is also an AESS Distinguished Lecturer and an approved AESS Short Course Instructor. He taught many short courses in radar, EW and RF worldwide, with a focus to underserved areas. He is also the Young Professionals coordinator for Region 1.

Students from Ventura County to Show Off Their Robots 🗓

Bring your kids! This is an excellent opportunity to get them interested in science and engineering.

IEEE Buenaventura Section
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Meeting Date: April 10, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation

Location: Thousand Oaks
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEEvtools

Summary: Students from Ventura County schools will demonstrate the robots they built for the VEX Robotics Competition. We will hear an introduction from the teams, followed by an extended demonstration.

About VEX
The VEX Robotics Competition, presented by the REC Foundation, is the largest and fastest growing middle school and high school robotics program globally with more than 20,000 teams from 50 countries playing in over 1,700 competitions worldwide. Each year, an exciting engineering challenge is presented in the form of a game. Students, with guidance from their teachers and mentors, build innovative robots and compete year-round.

IEEE USA President talks – Memories of Tomorrow 🗓

— Exploring the options for non-volatile memory to replace DRAM and SRAM

IEEE Computer Society and ACM
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Meeting Date: March 20, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Tom Coughlin
Location: Knobbe Martens, Irvine
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: Meetup

Summary: New computing architectures are being driven by the end of Moore’s Law scaling. At the same time AI, IoT, and faster connectivity will drive the need for more computing in data centers, at and beyond the network edge and in individual consumer and industrial devices. An important requirement to enable these new computational architectures and to improve computational efficiency and reduce energy consumption will be moving from volatile to non-volatile memories. There are many options for non-volatile memory to replace DRAM and SRAM including phase change memory (PCM, such as Intel’s Octane), magnetic random access memory (MRAM), ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) as well as FeFETs and resistive memory (RRAM). This talk will look at the drivers for new computing architectures, the future role of non-volatile memory (including computational storage and in-memory computing), and the candidates for non-volatile memories that will be used in tomorrow’s embedded devices and computers.

Bio: Tom Coughlin, is President, Coughlin Associates and President of IEEE USA, is a digital storage analyst as well as a business and technology consultant. He has over 37 years in the data storage industry with engineering and management positions at several companies.

Dr. Coughlin has many publications and six patents to his credit. Tom is also the author of Digital Storage in Consumer Electronics: The Essential Guide, which is now in its second edition with Springer. Coughlin Associates provides market and technology analysis as well as Data Storage Technical and Business Consulting services. Tom publishes the Digital Storage Technology Newsletter, the Media and Entertainment Storage Report, the Emerging Non-Volatile Memory Report and other industry reports. Tom is also a regular contributor on digital storage for Forbes.com and other blogs.

Tom is active with SMPTE (Journal article writer and Conference Program Committee), SNIA (including a founder of the SNIA SSSI), the IEEE, (he is past Chair of the IEEE Public Visibility Committee, Past Director for IEEE Region 6, President of IEEE USA and active in the Consumer Electronics Society) and other professional organizations. Tom is the founder and organizer of the Annual Storage Visions Conference (www.storagevisions.com as well as the Creative Storage Conference (www.creativestorage.org). He was the general chairman of the annual Flash Memory Summit for 10 years. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a member of the Consultants Network of Silicon Valley (CNSV).