Reactive Power Compensation using Plugged-in Electric Vehicles for an AC Power Grid 🗓

— sharing the knowledge and experience gained by the study of a utility relay mis-operation

IEEE PES Chapter Meeting
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Meeting Date: December 4, 2018
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Reza Sabzehgar, Ph.D. of San Diego State University
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website

Event Details: IEEE vTools
Summary: In recent years, Plugged-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) have become more popular due to the growing interest in energy security and emission reduction. In addition to fulfilling these objectives, PEVs can play a crucial role in balancing the active power as well as compensating the reactive power of the smart power grid. These ancillary services provided by PEVs, not only help in improving the reliability and quality of the power, but also benefit the grid operators and PEV owners financially. In this talk, a PEV-based reactive power compensation and a novel phase-detector-based feedback control system is discussed. The effects of reactive power compensation on the battery’s State-Of-Charge (SOC) are investigated. Also, detailed analyses are carried out to assess the impacts of various components of a reactive power compensation circuit. Simulation results are provided to support the analysis and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

When determining relay settings, Protection Engineers use Isc data from short-circuit computer programs to obtain the current flowing through the system for various faults. The program can be directed to show the contribution of current by any element in the system and for any fault in the system. Mutually coupling data must be entered into the program for those lines installed close to each other to get the result of any coupling voltages and currents during fault conditions.

This presentation will explain the miss-operation of a mutually coupled 69 kV line to a 230kV line that occurred on December 23rd, 2013 in the San Diego Gas & Electric 230/ 69 kV system.

The actual misoperation was due to a wrong directional decision made by a microprocessor relay for a duration of 4ms before dropping out. By this time a trip and a transfer trip was given to the line, isolating it from the 69 kV systems.

This line was protected with Phase Distance and Ground Directional over-current primary relay and Phase and Ground Directional over-current back up relaying, on one terminal and with Phase and Ground Distance protection for the Primary relaying and Directional Phase and Ground over-current backup protection over Audio Tone communication channel. Settings for this line were done using our traditional 80-85 percent PUTT line reach with the traditional higher setting for the Instantaneous ground elements due to Mutual coupling.

The purpose of this presentation is to share with other Protection Engineers the knowledge and experience gained by the study of a utility relay misoperation and the solution used to fix this problem by introducing Negative Sequence Elements logic to increase security and sensitivity in the relay setting and also explains how to avoid future relay misoperations.

Bio: (first & last name) is specialized in several areas related to Electrical Engineering including power electronics, energy harvesting, renewable energies, control applications in sustainable energy systems, mechatronics, and electric/hybrid electric vehicles. Prior joining San Diego State University, he was a faculty member of School of Energy at British Columbia Institute of Technology and the School of Engineering Science at Simon Fraser University, Metro Vancouver, Canada, where he also received his Ph.D. degree and continued his research as a postdoctoral fellow.

Dr. Sabzehgar have taught courses/labs on Power Electronics, Electronics Circuits, Industrial Electronics, Industrial Control, Microelectronics, and Electro-Mechanical Sensors and Actuators. His current research is focused on power electronics converters with application to energy harvesting from renewable energy sources and smart grids. Dr. Sabzehgar have published several articles in high impact factor journals and high-quality conference proceedings in the above areas sponsored by Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

Dr. Sabzehgar served as vice-chair and chair of Power Electronics Chapter of IEEE Vancouver, Canada. He also served as referee for several journals and conferences such as IET Journal on Power Electronics, Elsevier Journal on Ocean Engineering, Journal of Development and Applications of Oceanic Engineering, American Control Conference, American Society of Mechanical Engineers Conferences, and Iranian Conference on Electrical Engineering.

Using Data Science to Increase Shopper Productivity 🗓

Sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society San Diego Chapter
Co-Sponsored by IEEE Communications Society, IEEE Consumer Electronics Society and IEEE Young Professional of San Diego

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Meeting Date: December 6, 2018
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Geoffrey Hueter, Ph.D. of Certona Corporation
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: Recommender systems pose unique challenges to data scientists because the effectiveness of the recommendations can only be assessed by the response of the consumer. In this regard recommenders can be thought of as feedback control systems, whereby the control model parameters are adjusted to optimize the desired outcomes of the business.

The presentation will focus on various aspects of setting up a recommender system, including representation and collection of behavioral signals, development and testing of machine learning algorithms, and architecting a platform for combining past information with live inputs to make real-time decisions about what to next show the consumer. The presentation will also describe the experience of Certona Corporation in creating a commercial personalization platform that blends data science with business rules to satisfy the practical requirements of merchandizers and other non-scientist users.

Bio: Geoffrey Hueter is the CTO and Co-Founder of Certona Corporation, the leader in real time, AI powered omnichannel personalization for the world’s largest B2C and B2B brands and retailers. Dr. Hueter leads the invention of Certona’s innovative proprietary technologies, which have been awarded 8 patents to date. Dr. Hueter holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of California at San Diego, where he studied gamma ray bursts and was part of the team that developed the Gamma Ray Observatory. After receiving his Ph.D., Dr. Hueter studied neural networks with industry pioneers Robert Hecht Nielsen and Bart Kosko and then joined HNC Software (subsequently acquired by Fair Isaac), a startup that led the early commercialization of neural network (aka deep learning) technology.

As a Staff Scientist and Director, Dr. Hueter managed the development of intelligent machine vision systems, self-optimizing control systems, and other innovative applications of neural networks and cognitive systems, including several Department of Defense Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) programs. Dr. Hueter is the author of over a dozen papers on astrophysics, neural networks, and numerical modeling and holds the rare distinction of both hitting a home run and scoring on the Putnam test.

Non-Orthogonal-Multiplexing : An Enabling Technology for Next Generation Broadcast and Broadband Multimedia Communications 🗓

Broadcast Technology Society Event
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Meeting Date: December 6, 2018
Time: 5:30 PM Networking & Food; 6:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Liang Zhang of Senior Research Scientist Communications Research Centre, Ottawa – Canada
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: Non-orthogonal multiplexing (NOM) technology can provide significantly higher transmission capacity than the traditional orthogonal multiplexing (OM) technologies, when delivering multiple services with different quality of service (QoS) requirements. This has been recognized by research communities from both the broadcast industry and the mobile broadband industry.

The NOM technology can find many applications in future broadcast and broadband systems, including the simultaneous delivery of mobile and fixed services, seamless local content insertion, and delivery of mixed unicast-broadcast services in 4G/5G systems. A particular interesting new application scenario of NOM is recently developed to realize more efficient integrated broadcast service and backhaul (ISB) transmission, in both next generation ATSC 3.0 digital broadcast system and for 5G broadcasting system. This concept is directly related to the integrated access and backhaul (IAB) technology currently being studied for 5G NR.

This talk starts with the fundamental capacity benefit of NOM technology over OM technologies from the information theory point of view. Then, the different applications of NOM technology in future broadcast and broadband systems are introduced, including the benefit that NOM offers and the challenges to realize it in practice. General guidelines for achieving feasible implementation of NOM in practical systems are subsequently presented that keeps a low complexity and still achieve most of the NOM benefits.

As the second part of this lecture, the concept of using NOM to implement integrated service and backhaul links is introduced. First, the application of this concept in the next generation ATSC 3.0 is presented focusing on supporting low-power gap-fillers to improve the mobile service coverage performance for highly populated indoor and closed areas (airports, shopping malls, stadiums, etc.). Next, this concept is extended for integrated access and backhaul in 5G framework, where the focus is put on realizing a low-cost MBSFN over the low-power-low-tower broadband networks.

Bio: Dr. Liang Zhang received the bachelor’s degree in the department of electronic engineering and information science from the University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, in 1996, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in the department of electrical and computer engineering from the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada, in 1998 and 2002, respectively. Currently, he is a Senior Research Scientist with the Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Since joining CRC, he has conducted research on digital communications systems, communications theory development, signal processing algorithms, physical-layer transmission technologies, antenna technologies, cross-layer design, as well as MAC layer resource allocation and scheduling techniques.

Liang Zhang has been deeply involved in the ATSC 3.0 standardization activities on developing the layered-division-multiplexing technology, mixed fixed and mobile broadcast service delivery, mobile service detection, co-channel interference mitigation, integrated access and backhaul. He is currently working on technologies for the convergence of future TV broadcast and 5G broadband systems.

Previously, he was part of WorldDMB technical committee for the standardization of the Enhanced Stream/Packet Mode in DAB system, and the DAB+ system. He has also conducted research activities on detection technologies for 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.11 systems.

Dr. Zhang is a Senior Member of IEEE and an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Broadcasting. Dr. Zhang has more than 70 peer-reviewed Journal and conference publications and received multiple Best Paper Awards for his work on the next generation ATSC 3.0 and the 5G broadcasting systems.

How Pixel Detector ASICs Helped Find the Higgs Boson at CERN and Now Enable Spectroscopic X-ray Medical Imaging 🗓

IEEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: December 6, 2018
Time: 9AM Networking & Food; 9:10AM Presentation
Speaker: Michael Campbell Head of the Microelectronics Section, CERN (Geneva, Switzerland)
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: On July 4, 2012, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced the discovery of the long sought-after Higgs boson. This was the culmination of a huge scientific endeavor involving theorists, detector, and machine physics and an army of engineers and technicians. ASICs played a significant role in the design and construction of the experiments and were one of the key enabling technologies permitting efficient particle detection in an extremely hostile environment. The presentation will start with a lay-person’s description of a large high-energy physics experiment and review some of the challenges presented for ASIC designers by the LHC environment. The talk will then focus on inner tracking detectors based on hybrid pixels. Such detectors provide the possibility of unambiguous (noise hit free) particle detection, an essential feature for disentangling complicated particle collisions taking place 40 million times per second. The same technology has been adapted for applications beyond high-energy physics in various generations of the Medipix and Timepix chips. That work has led to numerous novel applications stretching from particle detection in classrooms to recent ground-breaking results in spectroscopic medical X-ray imaging. Particle detection in real time will be demonstrated and a number of related applications described.

Bio: Michael Campbell is Head of the Microelectronics Section in the Experimental Physics Department at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland where he has worked for over 30 years. He was one of the pioneers of pixel detector readout and of the use of radiation-hard-by-design techniques both of which are now exploited widely in ASICs at the Large Hadron Collider experiments. He is spokesperson of the Medipix2, Medipix3 and Medipix4 Collaborations who seek to disseminate pixel detector technology to many different fields. Michael received his PhD from the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland (his native city) and has authored several hundred scientific publications. In 2016, he was appointed Honorary Professor of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow.

Things We Should Not Do In Future Radios 🗓

(Future Designs Should Not Include Past Mistakes)

Co-sponsored bySan Diego IEEE Communications Society, San Diego IEEE Vehicular Technology Society
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Meeting Date: December 4, 2018
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Professor Fred Harris UCSD
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: Wireless technology is a shining example of a disruptive innovation that has changed society in remarkable ways. The innovation has altered how people communicate, how people access information, how people are entertained, and how people conduct and schedule their social lives. Every human activity advance and grows through several influences. One is experience, one is market forces, another is effective education, and yet another is common wisdom. Common wisdom is entrenched perspectives and levels of understanding accepted by the community as guide posts of the process. In fact, there are many examples to be found in the wireless community of common wisdom being faulty. Samuel Clemens’ comment “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you in trouble, it’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so” The wireless community is not free of entrenched faulty common wisdom which is passed on to successive practitioners of the art. Universities are just as liable as industry for not examining and questioning common wisdom. In this tongue in cheek presentation we examine the evolution of wireless technology from the early days through now and show how several wisdoms can be shown to not be wise but never-the-less have become entrenched in the fabric of our wireless technology.

Bio: Professor fred harris is at the University of California San Diego where he teaches and and conducts research on Digital Signal Processing and Communication Systems. He holds 40 patents on digital receiver and DSP technology and lectures throughout the world on DSP applications. He consults for organizations requiring high performance, cost effective DSP solutions.

He has written some 260 journal and conference papers, the most well-known being his 1978 paper “On the use of Windows for Harmonic Analysis with the Discrete Fourier Transform”. He is the author of the book Multirate Signal Processing for Communication Systems and has contributed to several other DSP books. His special areas include Polyphase Filter Banks, Physical Layer Modem design, and Synchronizing Digital Modems.

He was the Technical and General Chair respectively of the 1990 and 1991 Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems, and Computers, was Technical Chair of the 2003 Software Defined Radio Conference, of the 2006 Wireless Personal Multimedia Conference, of the DSP-2009, DSP-2013 Conferences and of the SDR-WinnComm 2015 Conference. He became a Fellow of the IEEE in 2003, cited for contributions of DSP to communications systems. In 2006 he received the Software Defined Radio Forum’s “Industry Achievement Award”.

Broadcast Technology Society Event: Non-Orthogonal-Multiplexing 🗓

— An Enabling Technology for Next Generation Broadcast and Broadband Multimedia Communications

IEEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: December 6, 2018
Time: 5:30 PM Networking & Food; 6:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Liang Zhang
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools
Summary:
Non-orthogonal multiplexing (NOM) technology can provide significantly higher transmission capacity than the traditional orthogonal multiplexing (OM) technologies, when delivering multiple services with different quality of service (QoS) requirements. This has been recognized by research communities from both the broadcast industry and the mobile broadband industry.

The NOM technology can find many applications in future broadcast and broadband systems, including the simultaneous delivery of mobile and fixed services, seamless local content insertion, and delivery of mixed unicast-broadcast services in 4G/5G systems. A particular interesting new application scenario of NOM is recently developed to realize more efficient integrated broadcast service and backhaul (ISB) transmission, in both next generation ATSC 3.0 digital broadcast system and for 5G broadcasting system. This concept is directly related to the integrated access and backhaul (IAB) technology currently being studied for 5G NR.

This talk starts with the fundamental capacity benefit of NOM technology over OM technologies from the information theory point of view. Then, the different applications of NOM technology in future broadcast and broadband systems are introduced, including the benefit that NOM offers and the challenges to realize it in practice. General guidelines for achieving feasible implementation of NOM in practical systems are subsequently presented that keeps a low complexity and still achieve most of the NOM benefits.

As the second part of this lecture, the concept of using NOM to implement integrated service and backhaul links is introduced. First, the application of this concept in the next generation ATSC 3.0 is presented focusing on supporting low-power gap-fillers to improve the mobile service coverage performance for highly populated indoor and closed areas (airports, shopping malls, stadiums, etc.). Next, this concept is extended for integrated access and backhaul in 5G framework, where the focus is put on realizing a low-cost MBSFN over the low-power-low-tower broadband networks.

Bio: Liang Zhang received the bachelor’s degree in the department of electronic engineering and information science from the University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, in 1996, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in the department of electrical and computer engineering from the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada, in 1998 and 2002, respectively. Currently, he is a Senior Research Scientist with the Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Since joining CRC, he has conducted research on digital communications systems, communications theory development, signal processing algorithms, physical-layer transmission technologies, antenna technologies, cross-layer design, as well as MAC layer resource allocation and scheduling techniques.

Liang Zhang has been deeply involved in the ATSC 3.0 standardization activities on developing the layered-division-multiplexing technology, mixed fixed and mobile broadcast service delivery, mobile service detection, co-channel interference mitigation, integrated access and backhaul. He is currently working on technologies for the convergence of future TV broadcast and 5G broadband systems.

Previously, he was part of WorldDMB technical committee for the standardization of the Enhanced Stream/Packet Mode in DAB system, and the DAB+ system. He has also conducted research activities on detection technologies for 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.11 systems.

Dr. Zhang is a Senior Member of IEEE and an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Broadcasting. Dr. Zhang has more than 70 peer-reviewed Journal and conference publications and received multiple Best Paper Awards for his work on the next generation ATSC 3.0 and the 5G broadcasting systems.

The Myth about Ground 🗓

— IEEE EMC Society Distinguished Lecturer Talk –

IEEE EMC Society San Diego
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Meeting Date: December 5, 2018
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Zhiping Yang, Senior Hardware Manager at Google
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
GROUND is widely used in high-speed circuit modeling and simulation. However, there are a lot of misconceptions and misunderstandings about ground in the high-speed circuit industry. Does ideal ground really exist? If not, why do we use it in simulations? Should we connect the reference node of S-parameter model to ideal ground? Is ground bounce real and well defined? Should we put partial inductance and resistance on the ground net? What can we do or cannot do with S-parameter model? These questions are commonly asked by high-speed circuit designers. Answers from different people may be quite different and even contradictory. In this presentation, these questions will be answered with some simple, but powerful examples. At the end, the audience should have a better understanding about the ground and how to use it in high-speed simulations.

Bio:
Zhiping Yang received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 1994 and 1997, respectively. He received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla in 2000. From 2000 to 2005, he worked for Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA, as a Technical Leader. From 2005 to 2006, he worked for Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA, as a Principal Engineer. From 2006 to 2012, he worked in Nuova Systems (which was acquired by Cisco in 2008) and Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA, as a Principal Engineer. From 2012 to 2015, he worked for Apple, Cupertino, CA, as a Senior Manager. He is currently a senior hardware manager in Google Consumer Hardware Group. His research interests include signal integrity and power integrity methodology development for Die/Package/Board co-design, high-speed optical module, various high-speed cabling solution, high-speed DRAM/storage technology, high-speed serial signaling technology, and RF interference. He has published more than 40 research papers and 17 patents. His research and patents have been applied in Google Chromebook, Apple iPhone 5S/6/6S, Cisco UCS, Cisco Nexus 6K/4K/3K, and Cisco Cat6K products. Dr. Yang is a senior IEEE member and received 2016 IEEE EMCS Technical Achievement Award.

Application of NFPA 820 in the Wastewater Treatment and Collection Facilities 🗓

— Overview of the Wastewater Treatment and Collection Facilities process and how NFPA 820 is applied

IEEE PES/IAS Joint Chapter of Orange County
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Meeting Date: November 15,2018
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 7:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Tony Acayan of Orange County Sanitation District
Location: Santa Ana, California
Cost: See link
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
An overview of the Wastewater Treatment and Collection Facilities process and how NFPA 820 is applied to each process area.

Bio:
Tony Acayan Tony joined Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) in January of 2017. Prior to joining OCSD, Tony worked at the Fluor Corporation for 25 years and with Jacobs Engineering for 3 years. Currently registered as a Professional Engineer in the State of California, Texas and Alaska. Tony holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

The “Affordable” Phased Array Antenna 🗓

— that will enable 5G and other applications

IEEE Coastal LA Section
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Meeting Date: December 7, 2018
Time: 7:00 PM Networking; 8:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Will Theunissen, Facebook Connectivity Labs
Location: Redondo Beach, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
For longer than two decades phased array designers have promised low cost approaches to phased array antennas. With LEO and MEO SATCOM constellations planned for service in the next few years, the demand for steerable beams with large apertures is going to require delivery on these promises. 5G requirements for array antennas have resulted in commercially viable volumes for those beamformer ICs. Even though SATCOM apertures are large, needing large numbers of modules, affordability continues to be a challenge. The talk will focus on Facebook Connectivity Lab (FBC) array antenna development and efforts working with beamformer IC suppliers to support the FBC mission of connecting the unconnected with SATCOM one of the potential vehicles. The talk also describes the lab and field testing of electrically steerable phased array antennas designed for implementation in multilayer circuit board architecture.

Bio: Will Theunissen was born in South Africa. He received the B.Eng. and M.Eng. (cum laude) degrees from the University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa, in 1988 and 1990, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa, in 2000, all in electrical engineering. He is currently an Antenna Engineer at Facebook Connectivity Labs in Northridge, CA. Previous employment includes Principal Engineer with Lockheed Martin Commercial Space and Researcher at The Ohio State University ElectroScience Laboratory, Columbus. His research interests include reflector and phased array antennas and software development for antenna synthesis and design.

Jacked, Extorted and Destroyed – 🗓

The Threats that Could Get You in 2019 and Beyond

IEEE Life Members Affinity Group LMAG
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Meeting Date: January 19, 2019
Time: 10AM – Noon Networking & Presentation
Speaker: Kevin Haley, Symantec
Location: Redondo Beach, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
If only it was a simple as protecting your data from theft. The threat landscape today is full of threats that do more than just steal IP. Today’s threats hijack, extort and even destroy computers. And these threats are directed at you. Join leading threat expert, Kevin Haley as he shares insights on what these new attacks are, on the overall cyber threat landscape, and the shifting trends and emerging threats.

Bio: Kevin Haley is Director of Product Management for Symantec Security Response where he is responsible for ensuring the security content gathered from Symantec’s Global Intelligence Network is actionable for its customers. This includes educating customers on security issues and incorporating the security content into Symantec’s enterprise and consumer product lines. The valuable security data provides the basis for protecting customers against complex Internet threats and other security risks. He served as a technical advisor for Anthony E. Zuiker’s digital crime thriller, “Cybergeddon.” He also frequently appears as a security expert for media including The Today Show, NBC Nightly News, Good Morning America, MSNBC, USA Today, New York Times, Forbes, Dow Jones and many others.