Multistatic 3D Whole Body Millimeter-Wave Imaging for Explosive Detection 🗓

Paste into Location field: Society Initials or IEEE committee (city)
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Meeting Date: December 6, 2019
Time: 10:00 PM
Speaker: Carey M. Rappaport
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Most of the airport passenger security systems use millimeter-wave radar portals to detect threats concealed under clothing. These sophisticated sensors employ advanced RF radar modules and GPU-based accelerated processing. While they are very sensitive, alerting on even small anomalies, they are prone to false alarms, which lead to invasive pat-downs.

New research in multistatic focusing radar systems has the potential to improve detection and lower false alarms. Improvements in the antenna system and in the inversion algorithms help rule out innocent objects while making the detection of non-shape-specific anomalies more likely, without increasing the processing time.

A proposed toroidal reflector antenna, consisting of a tilted ellipse rotated about the vertical axis, provides for multiple, overlapping high-resolution nearfield beams that form multi-view, true multistatic mm-wave imaging for security applications. Modeled results indicate the point spread function (PSF) on a torso target is wide and short, allowing for quickly computed 2D images which can be stacked to reconstruct detailed 3D surfaces. The elliptical curvature in the vertical plane focuses beams to narrow horizontal slices on the object to be imaged. With only this slice illuminated, the scattered field will be due to just this narrow portion of the subject, allowing for computationally simple inversion of a one-dimensional contour rather than an entire two-dimensional surface. Stacking the reconstructed contours for various horizontal positions provides the full object image.

Assuming typical smooth variations of the human body surfaces, the object detection is performed by comparing the retrieved surface with a smoothed one. In addition, weak dielectric explosive threats can be detected as foreign objects, and distinguished from innocuous concealed items. The improved advanced imaging technology system has the promise of reducing false alarms and minimizing pat-downs at airport security lines.

Bio:
Carey M. Rappaport received five degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology: the SB in Mathematics, the SB, SM, and EE in Electrical Engineering in June 1982, and the PhD in Electrical Engineering in June 1987. He is married to Ann W. Morgenthaler, and has two children, Sarah and Brian.

Prof. Rappaport joined the faculty at Northeastern University in Boston, MA in 1987. He has been Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering since July 2000. In 2011, he was appointed College of Engineering Distinguished Professor. He was Principal Investigator of an ARO-sponsored Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative on Humanitarian Demining, Co-Principal Investigator and Associate Director of the NSF-sponsored Engineering Research Center for Subsurface Sensing and Imaging Systems (CenSSIS), and Co-Principal Investigator and Deputy Director of the DHS-sponsored Awareness and Localization of Explosive Related Threats (ALERT) Center of Excellence.

Fast Motor Bus Transfer System, Auto Bus Transfer System and an overview of other Transfer Systems 🗓

— also a demonstration of testing of the relay logic using SEL relay and Omicron Test set.

IEEE PES/IAS Joint Chapter of Orange County
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Meeting Date: (date) 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food;
7:00 PM Presentation
The presentation is free and dinner can be purchased upon arrival, with choices: Chicken, fish, or vegetarian.
If purchasing meal: $30 for All attendees

Speakers:
Mike Gallo of Matzinger-Keegan, Inc
Tony Acayan of Orange County Sanitation District
Location: Santa Ana
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
A Fast Bus Transfer is the process of disconnecting a motor bus from the present source of power and effectively reconnecting to an alternate source of power within the minimum possible time to guarantee process continuity. A fast and successful bus transfer enables continuity of critical processes, thereby enabling the plant or industry to minimize losses due to unavoidable transfers or contingencies.

This presentation will cover Auto Bus Transfer Scheme Methods, as well as:
•A brief explanation of what a transfer scheme does.
•A brief description of the types of transfer schemes.
•Implementing relay logic for transfer schemes.

The presentation will also include a demonstration of testing of the relay logic using SEL relay and Omicron Test set.

Advanced Space Propulsion Concepts for Interstellar travel 🗓

— the kind of concepts that would make Star Trek possible

IEEE Coastal Los Angeles Section
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Meeting Date: December 6, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Mr. Greg Meholic
Location: Redondo Beach,
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
This talk will discuss the presently known and future speculated ways to provide propulsion for a spacecraft to visit other stars. The topics will start from conventional rocketry and end up discussing the kind of concepts that would make Star Trek possible, covering a myriad of possibilities in between.

Bio:
Mr. Greg Meholic is member of the AIAA Nuclear and Future Flight Propulsion Technical Committee, a regular chair of the Future Flight sessions at the Joint Propulsion Conferences, and has published a number of papers about faster-than-light travel, the construct of space-time, and the grand unified theory. He currently supports space launch vehicle concept development and propulsion system studies for the US Government.

Advanced Technology Enabling CubeSat and Flagship Missions 🗓

IEEE METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES SECTION
PHOTONICS SOCIETY CHAPTER
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Meeting Date: November 21, 2019
Time: 5:30 PM
Speaker: Dr. April D. Jewell
Location: California Institute of Technology, Pasadena,
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Significant advances in instrument technologies are enabling exciting new science in astrophysics, planetary science, and heliophysics. For example, JPL’s 2D-doping is a band structure engineering process that results in near- 100% internal quantum efficiency and ultrastability, and can be applied to virtually any silicon-based detector architecture. When paired with advanced UV coatings, 2D-doped detectors exhibit record performance. In this talk I will discuss these technologies and their application to the Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat
(SPARCS), currently in development. SPARCS will be a 6U CubeSat whose
mission will be to observe M stars in two ultraviolet (UV) bands—SPARCS far UV
(S-FUV: 153-171 nm) and SPARCS near UV (S-NUV: 260-300 nm). SPARCS
would be the first mission to provide time-dependent spectral slope, intensity and
evolution of M dwarf stellar radiation; measurements that are critical to deciphering
observations of planetary atmosphere from missions such as JWST.

Bio:
Dr. April D. Jewell is a member of the Technical Staff
in JPL’s Advanced Detectors, Systems and Nanoscience
Group. She has degrees from George Washington
University (BS, Chemistry) and Tufts University (PhD,
Chemistry). Her work is focused on post-fabrication
processing and optimization techniques for silicon-based
imagers with the goal of fine-tuning a detector’s
response for project- or mission-specific applications.
Dr. Jewell’s work is a combination of material science
and process development; she uses molecular beam
epitaxy (MBE) for surface band structure engineering and atomic layer deposition
(ALD) for nanometer-scale coatings and filters. Dr. Jewell’s surface science
background allows her to develop MBE and ALD processes that are general enough
that they can be applied to virtually any silicon-based imager. Dr. Jewell is a recent
recipient of SPIE’s Rising Researcher

Overview of Recent Developments in Satellite Communications 🗓

— a “bird’s eye view”

IEEE Buenaventura Section
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Meeting Date: November 21, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Fernando Nocedal of L3Harris
Location: Westlake Village
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Satellites have played a key role in the communication and information arenas for many decades now. Applications include basic long distance communications, broadcasting, navigation, remote sensing, earth observation, national security and worldwide expansion of the internet. New developments in the applications of satellites promise significant improvements in the quality of life for many people and, of course, some of these developments also involve risks and potential harm.

This presentation will present a “bird’s eye view” of some of the current developments in satellite communications. We will touch upon several aspects of this field, as seen from a user’s perspective, such as: the upcoming large LEO (low earth orbit) constellations; HTS-GEOs (high throughput satellites in geostationary orbits); the efforts of globalization of internet access; the upcoming WRC-19; challenges in the design of ground system; and the risks and hazards of the overcrowding of space.

Bio:
Fernando Nocedal is a Principal Systems Engineer at L3Harris in Simi Valley CA. He has been in the satcom industry since the early 80’s. He has served different roles in the industry: R&D, Operations, International Business Development, Engineering and also as an Entrepreneur. His research interests are in satcom networks, modulation techniques, interference analysis and optimization of satellite capacity. Nocedal received his M.S. and Ph.D. degree in E.E. from Stanford University and taught satellite communications courses at U.C. Berkeley extension for many years. He is a senior member of the IEEE.

Data-Driven Analysis of Events in Distribution Synchrophasors 🗓

— analysis of “events” is a key

IEEE San Diego PES & PELS Chapter Meeting
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Meeting Date: November 13, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Hamed Mohsenian-Rad is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UCR
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Synchrophasor measurements offer an unprecedented level of visibility in power distribution infrastructure. These are time-synchronized single-phase or three-phase voltage and current phasor measurements on medium and low voltage distribution circuits. However, data availability alone is not enough to enhance operational intelligence. In this talk, we make the case that the analysis of “events” is a key to translate the data from distribution synchrophasors into useful high-level information. An event in this study is defined rather broadly to include any major change in any component across the distribution feeder. The real data that is used in this study is obtained from a pilot distribution feeder in Riverside, CA. The goal is to enhance situational awareness in distribution grid by keeping track of the operation (or misoperation) of various grid equipment, assets, distribution energy resources, loads, etc. A combination of data-driven machine learning tools and hybrid model-based methodologies are discussed to automatically (and often remotely) detect, classify, and identify the causes of events and their characteristics in power distribution systems. Use cases are diverse and may include asset monitoring, non-intrusive load modeling, analysis of system dynamics, cybersecurity, etc.

Bio:
Dr. Hamed Mohsenian-Rad is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Bourns Family Faculty Fellow at the University of California, Riverside. His research interests include developing hybrid data-driven and model-based techniques for monitoring, control, and optimization of power systems and smart grids. He has received the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award, a Best Paper Award from the IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) General Meeting, and a Best Paper Award from the IEEE International Conference on Smart Grid Communications. Two of his papers are currently ranked as the two most cited journal articles in the field of smart grids. Dr. Mohsenian-Rad is the founding Director of the UC-National Lab Center for Power Distribution Cyber Security, a new cyber-security research initiative across four University of California campuses and two DoE National Labs. He also serves as the Associate Director of the Winston Chung Global Energy Center, an endowed research center in the area of energy and sustainability at UC Riverside. He has served as the PI for over $10 million smart grid research projects. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada in 2008. He currently serves as an Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, an Editor of the IEEE Power Engineering Letters, Vice-Chair of the IEEE Smart Grid Communications Technical Committee, and co-Chair of the IEEE Power and Energy Society Working Group on Big Data Access and Research Integration. Dr. Mohsenian-Rad received the UC Riverside Bourns College of Engineering Distinguished Teaching Award in 2017.

Medical device legacy software to IEC 62304 🗓

IEEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: November 12, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Mr. Liem Lam, Sr. Medical Product Safety Engineer at Nemko USA
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
This presentation will talk Medical device legacy software to IEC 62304 including introduction of IEC 62304 overall process, software safety classification, Risk management activities of legacy software, legacy software gap analysis activities, Rationale for use of legacy software, and The levels of changes made to legacy software.

Bio:
Mr. Liem Lam is Sr. Medical Product Safety Engineer at Nemko USA, Inc. and he is a member of AAMI for Medical product safety and IEEE for Medical product safety and Laser product. Liem has more than 10 years of experience in the field of medical devices compliance and more than 10 years of experience in the field of R&D HW/SW testing electrical and electronics products / systems. Prior Nemko Liem worked at CSA Group, Intertek, TUV SUD, California Instruments, Hewlett Packard and Qualcomm CDMA.

Principles of Power Integrity for PDN Design 🗓

IEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: November 6, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Larry D. Smith, Principal Signal Integrity engineer at Micron
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
The PDN delivers power to the on-die CMOS circuits. CMOS circuits are sensitive to the power supply voltage because of Fmax, Vmin and Jitter considerations. Logic core speed is limited by the instantaneous power supply voltage including PDN voltage droops. The power supply voltage is often raised up to overcome PDN voltage droops to enable the on-die circuit voltage to stay above the minimum voltage (Vmin) where the circuits will run at rated clock speed (a high percentage of Fmax). These are the important PDN considerations for all CMOS circuits.

Bio:
Larry D. Smith Larry D. Smith is a Principal Signal Integrity engineer at Micron specializing in Power Integrity since August 2018. Prior to joining Micron, he was a PI engineer at Qualcomm in the mobile computing space beginning in 2011. He worked at Altera from 2005 to 2011 and Sun Microsystems from 1996 to 2005, where he did development work in the field of signal and power integrity. Before this, he worked at IBM in the areas of reliability, characterization, failure analysis, power supply and analog circuit design, packaging, and signal integrity. Mr. Smith received the BSEE degree from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and the MS degree in material science from the University of Vermont. He has more than a dozen patents and has authored numerous journal and conference papers. His most recent work is a book entitled “Principles of Power Integrity for PDN Design” published by Prentice Hall in 2017.

Revisiting the Viterbi Algorithm and Its Early Secrets 🗓

–brief walk through a boom moment in digital communications

IEEE San Diego Section, Communications Chapter
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Meeting Date: November 5, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Keith Kunm
Location: San Diego
Cost: free IEEE members, $5 non-IEEE members
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
It’s been just over 50 years since A. J. Viterbi published his famous algorithm for decoding convolutional codes. While the Viterbi Algorithm’s core, best state or ACS, is well known, the need for tracing back in a code trellis is less so. His paper highlighted the role of block length in exploiting the then state-of-art bounds on error probability, and his novel method remains optimal in single-pass, maximum likelihood decoding and several other problem areas. Trace back was IP secretive in those early days. Yet it was the key to reaching the potential of both the codes and the algorithm. In honor of Viterbi’s many contributions, this talk revisits the VA, covering the insight of trace back as well, in theory and implementation. No prior experience in trellises and the VA is needed to appreciate this brief walk through a boom moment in digital communications that still reverberates today.

Bio:
Keith Kunm (COMSOC M ’76) holds a BSEE from Arizona State University and MS from Stanford University. He worked at LInkabit in the 1970s for two of the earliest practical coding experts, Jerry Heller and Andy Viterbi, mainly in sequential decoding, troposcatter, packet radio and LSI codecs, and SSMA. He then worked a few years in CVTs for electric cars, but it was way too early. So he returned to digital communications for the next 35 years, lastly on US Navy’s Mobile User Objective System SATCOM. Chasing SBIRs from time to time, these days, as AI7SI, he is working on amateur radio SDR, full circle back to his beginnings as a ham in 1964.

IEEE OC YP – November Boba Night 🗓

— grow your network with tasty boba tea and delicious appetizers!

IEEE OC Young Professionals
Meeting Date: Tuesday, November 5, 2018
Time:
6:30 – 7:00: Boba
7:00 – 7:30 Appetizers
7:30 – 9:00: Networking

Location: Irvine – Address is for Le Diplomate Cafe but we don’t meet inside due to space restrictions, come look for us at the tables under the white canopy across the cafe!
Cost: Free boba for IEEE members and self paid for non IEEE members.
RSVP: Just show up
Event Details: IEEE events

Summary:
Meet new friends and grow your network with tasty boba tea and delicious appetizers! We meet at the tables under the white canopy at University Town Center by UC Irvine. Whether you’re an EECS student looking to meet professionals, a young professional looking to grow their network or general IEEE member in the area, we’ll have something for you, even if you don’t like boba!