Matrix Drives Offer New Clean Power Architecture for Variable Frequency Drives 🗓

— Direct AC to AC commutation and elimination of the DC Buss

San Diego IEEE Industry Applications Society (IAS) chapter
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Meeting Date: May 29, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM
Speaker: Pierce Verleur, Yaskawa Electric of Yaskawa Electric
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: required, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
What is a Matrix Drive? Direct AC to AC commutation and elimination of the DC Buss.
Matrix versus traditional power deck architecture for VFDs
IEEE519 compliant solutions: a comparison.
Are present IEEE519 compliant solutions truly compliant in the total speed range of operation?
Efficiency of VFD/motor combination
Comparison of output voltage on traditional versus Matrix technologies
Reliability calculations MTBF
Ancillary considerations-floor space, handling waste heat,
Demonstration of real-time oscilloscope traces for input and output waveforms of Matrix drive

Bio: Mr. Verleur received a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and an MBA in Finance. He began his career as a staff engineer for Carpenter Steel Corp. He co-founded two companies Industrial Drives Design in 1984 and Rosa Automation Engineering in 1990. Rosa was merged with EMS of Cincinnati in 1995 and ultimately acquired by Magnetek in 1999. Pierce held the position of Western Facility General Manager for EMS from 1995 to 1999. The Magnetek Drives Group was acquired by Yaskawa Electric in early 2001.

Mr. Verleur’s experience with AC and DC drives began in 1980. He has worked extensively with motor and motion control since then, developing several new products as well as new solutions to traditional motor control applications. VFDs controlling induction motors in areas such as high-speed direct drive test stands and induction motor servo control are examples. More recently, addressing power quality issues associated with the usage of large HP VFDs have been required.

Design of Broadband, Linear, and High-Efficiency mm-Wave Power Amplifiers in Silicon for 5G Applications 🗓

— The state of the art of mm-Wave PAs in different device technologies

IEEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: May 15, 2019
Time:
3:00-3:10pm Sign-in and networking
3:10-5:00pm Seminar (with Q&A after seminar)
Speaker: Hua Wang, Georgia Institute of Technology
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
With 5G communication just around the corner, there is a rapidly increasing need for high-performance mm-Wave power amplifiers. However, these next-generation mm-Wave PAs are often expected to deliver nearly “perfect” performance. They should offer large output power to ensure sufficient link budget, broad bandwidth to support multi-standard communication or frequency reconfigurability/agility, high peak and back-off efficiency for energy saving, and also inherent linearity for Gbit/s complex modulations with minimum or even no digital pre-distortions (DPD). It is noteworthy that in conventional design notions a given PA design should simply take trade-offs among these performance aspects, instead of trying to achieve all of them. Interestingly, this somehow unreasonable quest for “perfect” mm-Wave PAs has recently stimulated a new wave of mm-Wave PA innovations at both circuit levels and architecture levels, which have substantially advanced the state of the art.
In this talk, we will first present the design fundamentals of power amplifiers with an emphasis for wireless communication applications. The state of the art of mm-Wave PAs in different device technologies will be reviewed based on the “Georgia-Tech Power Amplifiers Performance Survey.” We will next present several recent mm-Wave PA designs that feature various design techniques and innovations at both circuit-level (nonlinearity compensation, continuous-mode operations, broadband harmonic tuning) and architecture-level (such as Doherty and outphasing PAs). We will also showcase several mm-Wave PA/antenna co-design examples that exploit new antenna structures as a new design paradigm to further enhance mm-Wave PA output power and efficiency.

Bio: Hua Wang (M’05‒SM’15) is an associate professor at the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at Georgia Institute of Technology and the director of Georgia Tech Electronics and Micro-System (GEMS) lab. Prior to that, he worked at Intel Corporation and Skyworks Solutions on mm-Wave integrated circuits and RF front-end modules. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, in 2007 and 2009, respectively. Dr. Wang is interested in innovating mixed-signal, RF, and mm-Wave integrated circuits and hybrid systems for wireless communication, radar, imaging, and bioelectronics applications.

Machine Learning Application for Satellite Image Analysis: Methods and Case Studies 🗓

The IEEE Los Angeles Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society Chapter

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Meeting Date: May 30, 2019
Time: 5:30 PM Networking; 6:10 PM Presentation
Speaker: Vinay Viswambharan, Shairoz Sohail, and Sangeet Mathew
Location: Pasadena, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Remote sensing specialists from academia and industry have been using the latest progress in artificial intelligence to find more efficient and accurate methods to extract knowledge from the huge collection of satellite images accumulated in the past 30 years. In this talk, members from Esri’s imagery and A.I. teams will explain the technical details of using cutting edge machine learning and deep learning methods to analyze multi-source remote sensing data. The methods will be presented in an intuitive way and accessible to those with a light coding background. They will present use cases of using machine learning tools on Esri’s collection of remote sensing imagery to solve real world problems such as quickly detecting polluted swimming pools, identifying the unhealthy palm trees, and detecting damaged structures and roads post disaster. The presenters will also share their experiences about working at Esri and where the future of A.I and remote sensing is headed.

Bio: Speaker Team
Vinay Viswambharan is a product manager on the Imagery team at Esri, with a zeal for remote sensing and everything imagery. He has been working in geospatial industry for 20 years. He is also very active in developing case study classes for the Esri LearnGIS and MOOC program.

Sharioz Sohail is a data scientist on Esri’s GeoAI team. He works mainly on building deep learning models for aerial and satellite imagery, LiDar, drone feeds, and live video. He routinely solves problems from object detection and tracking, image classification, semantic segmentation, NLP, and other areas.

Sangeet Mathew is a senior software engineer at Esri. He is an experienced Product Engineer. His work focuses on Software QA, Programming Languages, Agile Methodologies, Software Design & Machine Learning. Certified in A.I. & Deep Learning.

Winners of ASA DataFest 2019 🗓

— 8 winning teams who can participate in the Celebration will present their findings

IEEE OC Computer Society & OCLB ASA
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Meeting Date: May 20, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation

Location: Irvine, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
DataFest 2019 was held at Chapman University May 3-5. DataFests are 48 hour hackathons where teams from Southern California are given data from a single source and compete for Data Insight, Data Visualization, and Use of External Data, as well as any other awards at the judges discretion. There were teams of 3 to 5 students from 7 different southern California universities or colleges.

This year the data was from Rugby Canada Women’s Sevens (their national team of seven women a game for seven minute halves [versus the usual 15 players playing 40 minute halves]). After a brief introduction to the DataFest, data and the “challenge” expressed by the data providers, team members of the 8 winning teams who can participate in the Celebration will present there findings. Those presentations will be followed by a Round Table Discussion

There were four data files with data collected during 2017-2018 season with different aspects of the game and training including layer level data are provided by the individual athletes themselves and by IMU/GPS devices worn on their vests during games; and data on each game played during the season:
1. Games.csv tells when, where, opponent, and high-level outcomes and events in the game (“box scores”).
2. Wellness.csv has self-reported health and wellness for each player.
3. RPE.csv has the Rate of Perceived Effort, self-reported workloads for each “session”. A session can be a workout or a game.
4. Gps.csv has position data for each player during a game.

“Cybersecurity: How Worried Should We Be?” 🗓

— a sober and realistic assessment

IEEE OC Computer Society & OCACM Meeting
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Meeting Date: May 15, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Bryan Cunningham
Location: Irvine
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: Cutting through the hype, Bryan Cunningham will give a sober and realistic assessment of the cybersecurity threat environment over the next 10 years. He will combine several macro trends with recent legal, technological, national, and economic security developments, putting together the “big picture” to set the stage for the meeting.

Bio: Bryan Cunningham. As the first Executive Director of UCI’s multidisciplinary Cybersecurity Policy & Research Institute, Cunningham is focused on solution-oriented strategies address technical, legal and policy challenges to combat cyber threats, protect individual privacy and civil liberties, maintain public safety and economic and national security and empower Americans to take better control of their digital security.

Cunningham is a leading international expert on cybersecurity law and policy, a former White House lawyer and adviser and a media commentator on cybersecurity, technology and surveillance issues. He has appeared on Bloomberg, ABC, CBS, CNN, FOX and other networks.

Cunningham has extensive experience in senior U.S. government intelligence and law enforcement positions. He served as Deputy Legal Adviser to then-National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice. He also served six years in the Clinton Administration as a senior CIA officer and federal prosecutor. He drafted significant portions of the Homeland Security Act and related legislation, helping to shepherd them through Congress. He was a principal contributor to the first National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace, worked closely with the 9/11 Commission and provided legal advice to the President, National Security Advisor, the National Security Council, and other senior government officials on intelligence, terrorism, cybersecurity and other related matters.

Aleksandar Babic – Overview of Full Stack Development 🗓

– as well as his career path

IEEE Coastal LA Young Professionals
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Meeting Date: May 21, 2019
Time: 7:00 PM Networking & Presentation
Speaker: Aleksandar Babic, Senior Architect at Zilker Technology
Location: Hawthorne
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: eventbrite

Summary:
Join IEEE Coastal LA Young Professionals for our first 2019 Speaker Series with Aleksandar Babic. Want to become a full stack developer or learn more? Aleksandar will discuss an Overview of Full Stack Development as well as his career path.

Bio: Aleksandar Babic is the 2019 IEEE Coastal Los Angeles Section Chair and a self-driven software engineer with 15+ years of experience with expertise in multiple domains, such as Cloud, Enterprise, Mobility, and DevOps. He is currently a senior architect at Zilker Technology. Zilker Technology is an expert Digital Consultancy and Systems Integrator that combines the agility of a start-up with the experience and expertise of a global consulting firm.

Deep Reinforcement Learning Applied to the Game of Qwixx 🗓

–Without knowing any rules about the game the algorithm eventually learns winning strategies

IEEE San Diego Section CIS Chapter
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Meeting Date: May 16, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Gideon Prior of General Atomics
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: Reinforcement learning methods have been steadily gaining popularity within the machine-learning community as an approach to learn gaming strategy through trial and error. One of the downsides of classical reinforcement learning is the limited applicability to games with a large state spaces which has resulted in the adoption of deep learning methods to approximate value functions defined over the state. However learning can still be difficult for complex games, particularly for those with a large stochastic component that can results in similar strategies having very different outcomes. In this work a deep reinforcement learning algorithm is presented to address these issues as seen in a representative dice based multi-player game known as Qwixx. Without knowing any rules about the game the algorithm eventually learns winning strategies by playing against a human generated method based on optimal control.

Bio: Gideon Prior was born in Los Angeles California in 1975. He received a B.S. (2007), M.S (2009) and Ph.D. (2013) degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, San Diego. He joined General Atomics in La Jolla, California in 2006 where he has worked in research and development on projects including axial flux motor control, autonomous underwater navigation, aircraft arresting gears, high voltage DC breakers, hypersonic missile trajectory estimation and prediction and long distance high energy laser control.

His research interests include reinforcement learning, evolutionary algorithms, recurrent neural networks, optimal control, switched input systems and power electronics.

Ultra-Low-Power Integrated Circuits and Physiochemical Sensors for Next-Generation “Unawearables” 🗓

— emerging sensor technologies that can non-invasively monitor physiochemistry

IEEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: May 2, 2019
Time: 11AM Networking; 11:10 PM Presentation
Speaker: Patrick Mercier, UCSD
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary: Wearable devices hold considerable promise to diagnose, monitor, and treat various medical conditions and/or track the real-time status of athletes. However, most current generation wearable devices only monitor a limited number of physical and electrophysiological parameters that are, in many cases, only peripherally related to many health conditions or fitness enterprises. Furthermore, many such wearable devices are large, bulky, and rigid, thereby precluding seamless integration into daily life.

Addressing these issues requires: 1) development of new sensor technologies that provide more actionable data in thin, flexible form factors; 2) engineering of supporting electronic infrastructure to condition, digitize, and wirelessly communicate data in an extremely energy efficient manner; and 3) new data analytics to process and understand newly generated data streams. This presentation will discuss emerging sensor technologies that can non-invasively monitor physiochemistry (e.g., glucose, blood alcohol concentration, and lactate) in thin, flexible, and energy-efficiency wearable devices, alongside a brief look at what kind of analytics are necessary to parse and understand this data. We will also cover integrated circuit building blocks and architectures that make acquisition and telemetry of sensed information so energy-efficient that that they can be easily powered from new local energy sources (e.g., wearable glucose biofuel cells). Such net-zero-power operation will ultimately enable devices that are completely autonomous and invisible to the user, to the point where users are virtually unaware of their wearable devices after placement – in other words, they are “unawearable” devices.

Bio: Patrick Mercier is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and co-founder/co-director of the Center for Wearable Sensors at UC San Diego. He received his B.Sc. degree from the University of Alberta, Canada, in 2006, and the S.M. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in 2008 and 2012, respectively. Prof. Mercier has received numerous awards, including the NSF CAREER Award in 2018, the Biocom Catalyst Award in 2017, the UCSD Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award in 2016, the DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2015, the Beckman Young Investigator Award in 2015, The Hellman Fellowship Award in 2014, the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) Jack Kilby Award in 2010, amongst others. He has published over 110 peer-reviewed papers in venues such as Nature Biotechnology, Nature Communications, ISSCC (13 papers in the last six years), Advanced Science, and others. He is an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems and the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Letters, is a member of the ISSCC, CICC, and VLSI Technical Program Committees, and has co-edited two books: Power Management Integrated Circuits (CRC Press, 2016), and Ultra-Low-Power Short-Range Radios (Springer, 2015). His research interests include the design of energy-efficient mixed-signal systems, RF circuits, power converters, and sensor interfaces for wearable, medical, and mobile applications.