Past Meetings/Webinars

Power Electronic-based Distribution Systems (PEDS) 🗓

— a new small-signal stability analysis method, based on d-q impedance measurement and Generalized Nyquist Criterion (GNC)

San Diego IEEE PELS & PES Chapter
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Meeting Date: October 9, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Amin Salmani
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Power Electronic-based Components (PECs) such as Solid State Transformers (SSTs), power electronic-based converters, and motor drives provide highly useful features such as, load regulation, high power factor injection, and improved transient performance for Power Electronic-based Distribution Systems (PEDS). This is especially the case in contemporary power systems and large scale smart grids, which have high penetrations of renewable energy resources. However, the drawback is that they can operate as negative impedances while connected to the Constant Power Loads (CPLs) and CPLs are prone to small-signal instability due to their high power factor and constant-power nature in the system. Therefore, small-signal stability of the PEDS plays a prominent role in the different stages of systems analysis. In this presentation, a new small-signal stability analysis method, based on d-q impedance measurement and Generalized Nyquist Criterion (GNC), is discussed. Furthermore, the stability of an SST connected to an ideal source and programmable AC load is comprehensively investigated under various loading conditions and through Power Hardware-In-the-Loop (PHIL) experimentation.

Bio:
Dr. Amin Salmani has more than 10 years of hands-on experience with solution development, evaluation, design, implementation, and advisory service in energy and power industry with focus on “Power Electronics Applications, Emerging Technologies, Microgrids, and Advanced Energy Storage Systems”.

Dr. Salmani has provided consulting services to two of California’s utilities (PG&E and SDG&E) and has worked for different power systems solution providers (such as Varentec Inc.). In his current role, Amin is a Principal Engineer in DER group at SDG&E.

Gate-tunable Zero-index Materials and Meta-photonics for Extreme Light-matter Interaction 🗓

— research efforts on tunable meta/ENZ-optics for developing emerging optical applications

San Diego IEEE Photonics Society
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Meeting Date: October 7, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Howard Lee, Assistant Professor, Department of Physics, Baylor University
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Controlling the flow of light is fundamental to optical applications. With the recent advances in nanofabrication capabilities and new theoretical concepts, ground breaking platforms for the nanoscale manipulation of light have been demonstrated in recent years. These include metasurface and epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) materials and structures, which offer unique optical features such as sub-wavelength field confinement, unusual optical nonlinear/quantum properties and advanced wavefront shaping for emerging optical imaging, bio/optical sensing, and communication applications.

This talk will review research efforts on tunable meta/ENZ-optics for developing emerging optical applications. Dr Howard Lee will present recent developments on the use of transparent conducting oxide materials to demonstrate a gate-tunable optical metasurfaces that can tune the optical phase and amplitude for ultrathin beam steering devices [1]. In addition, a broadband, field-effect tunable, and ultrathin ENZ perfect absorber enabled by the excitation of ENZ modes will be discussed [2,3]. Dr Lee will also discuss the active control of emission properties of quantum emitters and enhanced ultrafast optical nonlinearity in hybrid ENZ-plasmonic heterostructures. Finally, he will present a study on “Meta”-optical fiber by integrating metasurfaces and zero-index materials with optical fibers to develop novel and ultracompact in-fiber optical devices such as an optical fiber metalens and a color filter [4,5]. These advanced “meta”/ENZ-optical fibers open the path to revolutionary in-fiber lasers, optical imaging, and optical/quantum communication devices [6].

Bio:
Dr. Howard Lee is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics at Baylor University and IQSE Fellow and visiting professor in the Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE) at Texas A&M. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science at Caltech, working with Prof. Harry Atwater in active plasmonics/metasurfaces. He received his PhD in Physics from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light in Germany in 2012 under the supervision of Prof. Philip Russell (2015 President of OSA). His work on nano-optics and plasmonics has led to 35 publications in various journals, such as Science, Nano Letters, Advanced Materials, and Optics Letters as well as 50 invited talks and 130 conference papers. Dr. Lee is a recipient of a 2019 DARPA Director’s Fellowship, a 2019 OGC Young Scientist Award, a 2018 NSF CAREER Award, a 2017 DARPA Young Faculty Award, a 2018 OSA Ambassador, a 2017 APS Robert S. Hyer Award, a 2018 Baylor Young Investigator Award, a 2016 Baylor Proposal Development Award, and a 2012 Croucher Postdoctoral Fellowship. He has organized seven technical conference sessions on advanced optical metasrufaces (META, PQE, and OSA Advanced Photonics 2016-2019) and he will serve as Symposium Chair for Material Research Society (MRS) Fall Meeting 2019 and Spring Meeting 2020. He currently serves as an Associate Editor for OSA Continuum and Nature Scientific Report journals. His group has successfully awarded external grants with total amount of > $3.5M in the first three and half years at Baylor University.

Mixed-Signal Technologies for Ultra-Wide Band Signal Processing Systems 🗓

— challenges faced by analog designers in CMOS

San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: October 3, 2019
Time: 3:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Gabriele Manganaro, Analog Devices (Wilmington, MA)
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Demand for ultra-wideband data acquisition and real time processing systems handling analog signals in the GHz range comes from applications in high performance instrumentation, defense and infrastructure communication systems among others. In these cases, front-end circuitry and ADCs/DACs are rapidly getting integrated together with front-end digital processing, preferably in mixed-signal CMOS systems-on-a-chip. This lecture will briefly review some of the technical challenges faced by analog designers developing such systems along with some the technologies behind that. The performance demands, coupled together with limitations of the underlying technologies such as those of nanometer CMOS processes and die packaging, require a comprehensive design approach combining circuits and architectural innovation with algorithmic techniques. This lecture introduces some of the present engineering approaches being developed to tackle such challenges.

Bio:
Dr. Gabriele Manganaro (S’95, M’98, SM’03, F’16) holds a Dr.Eng. and a Ph.D. degree in Electronics from the University of Catania, Italy. Starting in 1994, he did research with ST Microelectronics and at Texas A&M University. He worked in data converters' IC design at Texas Instruments, Engim Inc, and as Design Director at National Semiconductor. Since 2010 he has been with Analog Devices, first as an Engineering Director for High Speed Data Converters, and more recently as a Technology Director in the Wireless Communication Products Division. He served in the technical sub-committee for Data Converters of the ISSCC for seven consecutive years. He was Associate Editor for IEEE Trans. Circuits and Systems – Part II and then Associate Editor, Deputy Editor in Chief and finally Editor in Chief for IEEE Trans. Circuits and Systems – Part I. He is presently the Editor in Chief for the IEEE Open Journal of Circuits and Systems. He authored/co-authored more than 60 peer-reviewed papers, three books (notably “Advanced Data Converters”, Cambridge University Press, 2011) and has been granted 17 US patents, with more pending. He was recipient of scientific awards, including the 1995 CEU Award from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK), the 1999 IEEE Circuits and Systems Outstanding Young Author Award and the 2007 IEEE European Solid-State Circuits Conference Best Paper Award. He is an IEEE Fellow (since 2016), a Fellow of the IET (since 2009), Member of the scientific honor society Sigma Xi, and was a member of the Board of Governors for the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society (2016-18). He is a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society (term 2019-20) and an industry advisory member for Proceedings of the IEEE. Gabriele has received international technical & leadership recognition; he is often invited to speak on technical subjects at key conferences and top universities and developed and taught graduate professional courses in data converters design and mixed-signal design at the University of Oxford (UK).

Towards Sustainable Electric Transportation Systems 🗓

— charge using renewable energy resources at times when the power grid is not under stress

IEEE Central Coast Section
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Meeting Date: October 16, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Professor Mahnoosh Alizadeh Ph.D. – UCSB ECE
Location: Goleta
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
The mobility scene is going to change rapidly in the coming years as electric vehicle (EV) adoption rates increase, ride sharing continues to grow, and autonomous vehicles proliferate. However, it is well-known that the environmental benefits of transportation electrification will only be realized if electric vehicles (EVs) are charged using renewable energy resources, and at times when the power grid is not under stress. In this talk, I will present some of our recent research results on methods that can enable sustainable EV charging practices in smart cities, ranging from personal vehicle charging in parking lots or fast charging station to autonomous mobility-on-demand platforms that operate a fleet of EVs.

Bio:
Mahnoosh Alizadeh is an assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Alizadeh received the B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology in 2009 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California Davis in 2013 and 2014 respectively, both in Electrical and Computer Engineering. From 2014 to 2016, she was a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University. Her research is focused on the design of network control and optimization algorithms for societal-scale cyber-physical systems, with a particular focus on renewable energy integration in the power grid and electric transportation systems. She is a recipient of the NSF

Simulation & Modeling of Spacecraft Electric Propulsion 🗓

— Electric and plasma propulsion

IEEE Buenaventura Section
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Meeting Date: October 17, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Lubos Brieda
Location: Agoura Hills
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
This talk will discuss simulation approaches used by the spacecraft electric propulsion (SEP) community. Electric, or plasma, propulsion, uses electromagnetic fields to ionize and accelerate propellant to velocities higher than achievable with conventional chemical rockets. The first part of the talk will review some common SEP devices. We will then discuss kinetic and fluid approaches used for modeling the discharge and the plume regions. These simulations are used to optimize the device operation and to study any detrimental spacecraft interaction effects.

Bio:
Lubos Brieda has received his Master’s in Aerospace Engineering from Virginia Tech in 2005 and his Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from The George Washington University in 2012. His graduate work focused on developing simulation tools for modeling electric propulsion devices and their interaction with spacecraft components. He has worked as research engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards AFB, and a contamination engineer at NASA Goddard. Since 2012, he has working providing plasma and rarefied gas modeling support through his company Particle in Cell Consulting LLC. He also offers online plasma simulation courses, which have been summarized in a book to be released this winter.

Cybersecurity is no longer just an IT problem – 🗓

— Get a FREE PASS to hear a panel of C-level executives who’ve mitigated the risk of Cyber Attacks

Meeting Dates: October 23, 2019

Location: Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Santa Ana-Orange County Airport

Featured Keynote Speaker: Darin Andersen, CEO & Co-Founder of NXT Robotics
“Why AI and Automation is the Future of Cybersecurity”

Information and registration: FutureCon
Please use the promo code IEEE to register for a FREE full day pass to exhibits and conference.

Summary:
FutureCon Events brings high-level Cyber Security Training discovering cutting-edge security approaches, managing risk in the ever-changing threat of the cybersecurity workforce. Join us as we talk with a panel of C-level executives who have effectively mitigated the risk of Cyber Attacks. Educating C-suite executives and CISOs (chief information security officers) on the global cybercrime epidemic, and how to build Cyber Resilient organizations.
“Cybersecurity is no longer just an IT problem”
Gain the latest knowledge you need to enable applications while keeping your computing environment secure from advanced Cyber Threats. Demo the newest technology, and interact with the world’s security leaders and gain other pressing topics of interest to the information security community. Download the FutureCon event App to be part of the ongoing FutureCon community giving you the resources to stay one step ahead of Cyber challenges. The FutureCon community will keep you updated on the future of the Cyberworld and allow you to interact with your peers and the world’s security leaders

Leveraging Innovation Team Success with Systems Thinking 🗓

— what is possible when you link Innovation with Systems Thinking.

IEEE Consultants’ Network of San Diego
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Meeting Date: October 14, 2019
Time: 6:00 – 7:00 pm – Dinner and informal networking
7:00 – 8:30 pm – Meeting
Speaker: Dr. Julia Taylor
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
How would you like to increase your return on innovation investment by quantum leaps? How confident are you that your approach is getting you where you want to go? Systems Thinking offers great promise in helping you get your innovation efforts to pay off! Dr. Taylor will offer a fresh new perspective on this topic. She will show you some convincing evidence, from companies like Intel and Apple, about what is possible when you link Innovation with Systems Thinking.

Bio:
Dr. Julia Taylor just presented a paper at the Western States Regional Conference, and earlier this year gave a presentation at the American Chemical Society National Symposium.

She has two technical degrees, one in Chemistry and one in Electronics. She has worked at companies like Buckman Laboratories and Intel. She holds two business degrees, a Doctorate in Business focusing on Strategic Management, which about long-term business planning. She studied with H. Igor Ansoff, a pioneer in the field. She also has an MBA from Santa Clara University, a very difficult business school. She served in several executive positions for Toastmasters International, and completed their highest level of achievement, the DTM.

She is currently serving as a Director for INCOSE, San Diego, and participates in the Engineering Council of San Diego.

She works as a Management Consultant helping companies to Diagnose Problems, Build Teams and achieve greater levels of Group Collaboration.

She has one technical publication and she wrote 3 books on team building highlighting how people can work together better.

Dissecting Design Choices in Continuous-time Delta-Sigma Converters 🗓

— various alternatives for the design of power efficient single-loop continuous-time delta sigma converters.

IEEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: September 30, 2019
Time: 3:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Shanthi Pavan, Professor of Electrical Engineering at IIT Madras
Location: San Diego, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Continuous-time Delta-Sigma Modulators (CTDSMs) are a compelling choice for the design of high resolution analog-to-digital converters. Many delta-sigma architectures have been published (and continue to be invented). This leaves the designer with a bewildering array of choices, many of which seem to pull in opposite directions. Further, it is often difficult to make a clear comparison of various architectures, as they have been designed for dissimilar specifications, by different design groups, and in different technology nodes. This talk examines various alternatives for the design of power efficient single-loop continuous-time delta sigma converters.

Bio:
Shanthi Pavan received the B.Tech from IIT Madras in 1995 and the doctoral degree from Columbia University, New York City, in 1999. He is currently a Professor of Electrical Engineering at IIT Madras. His research interests are in the areas of high speed analog circuit design and signal processing. He is a recipient of many awards, including the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Darlington Best Paper Award (2009) , the Swarna Jayanthi Fellowship (2009) and the Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Award (2012). He has served as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems: Regular Papers. He has served on the Technical Program Committee at the International Solid State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), and as a Distinguished Lecturer of the Solid-State Circuits Society. He is currently a distinguished lecturer of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society. He is a fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering (INAE) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). He is the coauthor (with Richard Schreier and Gabor Temes) of “Understanding Delta Sigma Converters”, published by the Wiley-IEEE Press.

Hybrid PLL Architectures and Implementations 🗓

–an analog proportional path in combination with a digital integral path

IEEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: September 26, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Daniel Friedman
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Depending on the target application and on implementation constraints, both conventional charge pump PLLs and high performance digital PLLs may be excellent implementation choices. Each design type offers significant technical advantages while also raising its own set of design challenges. For example, charge pump PLLs naturally provide a feedback signal that is linearly related to phase error, but typically demand the use of a physically large loop filter capacitor if lower loop bandwidths are desired. High performance digital PLLs solve the loop capacitor problem, but may require a high performance time-to-digital converter as part of the feedback linearization solution. This presentation will focus on the exploration of a hybrid PLL architecture, an approach which features an analog proportional path in combination with a digital integral path, thus in some way offering the best of both PLL worlds. The approach will be introduced and explored through the presentation of multiple high-performance integrated hybrid PLL implementations in deep submicron CMOS technologies.

Bio:
Daniel Friedman is currently a Distinguished Research Staff Member and Senior Manager of the Communication Circuits and Systems department of the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center. He received his doctorate from Harvard University and subsequently completed post-doctoral work at Harvard and consulting work at MIT Lincoln labs, broadly in the area of image sensor design. After joining IBM, he initially developed field-powered RFID tags before turning to high data rate wireline and wireless communication. His current research interests include high-speed I/O design, PLL design, mmWave circuits and systems, and circuit/system approaches to enabling new computing paradigms. He was a co-recipient of the Beatrice Winner Award for Editorial Excellence at the 2009 ISSCC, the 2009 JSSC Best Paper Award, the 2017 ISSCC Lewis Winner Outstanding Paper Award; and the 2017 JSSC Best Paper Award; he holds more than 50 patents and has authored or co-authored more than 75 publications. He was a member of the BCTM technical program committee from 2003-2008 and of the ISSCC international technical program committee from ISSCC 2009 through ISSCC 2016; he served as the Wireline sub-committee chair from ISSCC 2012 through ISSCC 2016. He has served as the ISSCC Short Course Chair from 2017 to the present, and is a member of the SSCS Adcom since 2018.

From Bits to Gigabits, Using Software Defined Radio 🗓

–basics of SDR

IEEE Coastal LA
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Meeting Date: September 23, 2019
Time: 11:30AM Pizza & Networking;12:00 Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Eugene Grayver is a Principal Engineer in the Digital Communications Implementation Division at The Aerospace Corporation.
Location: El Segundo, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Have you ever wanted to build a magic receiver that can get images from weather satellites, decode ship and airplane position messages, tune to your favorite FM station, and even navigate by GPS? All of this is possible today using a $50 USB dongle and a laptop running software defined radio (SDR) code. This talk will cover the basics of SDR – from getting an analog signal into a computer to the wide range of frameworks and tools available to process the signal. We will briefly discuss radios that can process gigabits and gigahertz of data, and tiny SDRs that can run off batteries. Software being the key part of SDR, we will discuss the challenges of executing real-time signal processing at high rates on COTS servers. Finally, we will touch on the evolution of SDRs as applied to 5G, ground stations, and how it all ends up in the ‘cloud.’

Bio:
Dr. Eugene Grayver received his B.S from Caltech and a Ph.D. from UCLA, both in electrical engineering. In 2000, he was one of the founders of a semiconductor company working on low-power ASICs for multi-antenna 3G mobile receivers. In 2003, Eugene joined The Aerospace Corporation, where he is currently doing research into application of software defined radio (SDR) to a wide range of problems. Key aspects of his research include: reliable and resilient communications, navigation using GPS and fallback options when GPS is not available, flexible and upgradable processing for massively multi-user systems. His areas of expertise span from radio-frequency front ends to digital signal processing and up to the network connectivity. This research has led to hardware implementations of devices that support data rates from below 100 bps to 10 Gbps. He published a well-received book on SDR, multiple journal publications, and dozens of conference papers. Every year he chairs a session on software defined radio at an international IEEE conference. Eugene is a senior member of IEEE.