Past Meetings/Webinars

Data-Driven Analysis of Events in Distribution Synchrophasors 🗓

— analysis of “events” is a key

IEEE San Diego PES & PELS Chapter Meeting
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Meeting Date: November 13, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Hamed Mohsenian-Rad is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UCR
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Synchrophasor measurements offer an unprecedented level of visibility in power distribution infrastructure. These are time-synchronized single-phase or three-phase voltage and current phasor measurements on medium and low voltage distribution circuits. However, data availability alone is not enough to enhance operational intelligence. In this talk, we make the case that the analysis of “events” is a key to translate the data from distribution synchrophasors into useful high-level information. An event in this study is defined rather broadly to include any major change in any component across the distribution feeder. The real data that is used in this study is obtained from a pilot distribution feeder in Riverside, CA. The goal is to enhance situational awareness in distribution grid by keeping track of the operation (or misoperation) of various grid equipment, assets, distribution energy resources, loads, etc. A combination of data-driven machine learning tools and hybrid model-based methodologies are discussed to automatically (and often remotely) detect, classify, and identify the causes of events and their characteristics in power distribution systems. Use cases are diverse and may include asset monitoring, non-intrusive load modeling, analysis of system dynamics, cybersecurity, etc.

Bio:
Dr. Hamed Mohsenian-Rad is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Bourns Family Faculty Fellow at the University of California, Riverside. His research interests include developing hybrid data-driven and model-based techniques for monitoring, control, and optimization of power systems and smart grids. He has received the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award, a Best Paper Award from the IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) General Meeting, and a Best Paper Award from the IEEE International Conference on Smart Grid Communications. Two of his papers are currently ranked as the two most cited journal articles in the field of smart grids. Dr. Mohsenian-Rad is the founding Director of the UC-National Lab Center for Power Distribution Cyber Security, a new cyber-security research initiative across four University of California campuses and two DoE National Labs. He also serves as the Associate Director of the Winston Chung Global Energy Center, an endowed research center in the area of energy and sustainability at UC Riverside. He has served as the PI for over $10 million smart grid research projects. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada in 2008. He currently serves as an Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, an Editor of the IEEE Power Engineering Letters, Vice-Chair of the IEEE Smart Grid Communications Technical Committee, and co-Chair of the IEEE Power and Energy Society Working Group on Big Data Access and Research Integration. Dr. Mohsenian-Rad received the UC Riverside Bourns College of Engineering Distinguished Teaching Award in 2017.

Medical device legacy software to IEC 62304 🗓

IEEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: November 12, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Mr. Liem Lam, Sr. Medical Product Safety Engineer at Nemko USA
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
This presentation will talk Medical device legacy software to IEC 62304 including introduction of IEC 62304 overall process, software safety classification, Risk management activities of legacy software, legacy software gap analysis activities, Rationale for use of legacy software, and The levels of changes made to legacy software.

Bio:
Mr. Liem Lam is Sr. Medical Product Safety Engineer at Nemko USA, Inc. and he is a member of AAMI for Medical product safety and IEEE for Medical product safety and Laser product. Liem has more than 10 years of experience in the field of medical devices compliance and more than 10 years of experience in the field of R&D HW/SW testing electrical and electronics products / systems. Prior Nemko Liem worked at CSA Group, Intertek, TUV SUD, California Instruments, Hewlett Packard and Qualcomm CDMA.

Principles of Power Integrity for PDN Design 🗓

IEE San Diego Section
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Meeting Date: November 6, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Larry D. Smith, Principal Signal Integrity engineer at Micron
Location: San Diego
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
The PDN delivers power to the on-die CMOS circuits. CMOS circuits are sensitive to the power supply voltage because of Fmax, Vmin and Jitter considerations. Logic core speed is limited by the instantaneous power supply voltage including PDN voltage droops. The power supply voltage is often raised up to overcome PDN voltage droops to enable the on-die circuit voltage to stay above the minimum voltage (Vmin) where the circuits will run at rated clock speed (a high percentage of Fmax). These are the important PDN considerations for all CMOS circuits.

Bio:
Larry D. Smith Larry D. Smith is a Principal Signal Integrity engineer at Micron specializing in Power Integrity since August 2018. Prior to joining Micron, he was a PI engineer at Qualcomm in the mobile computing space beginning in 2011. He worked at Altera from 2005 to 2011 and Sun Microsystems from 1996 to 2005, where he did development work in the field of signal and power integrity. Before this, he worked at IBM in the areas of reliability, characterization, failure analysis, power supply and analog circuit design, packaging, and signal integrity. Mr. Smith received the BSEE degree from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and the MS degree in material science from the University of Vermont. He has more than a dozen patents and has authored numerous journal and conference papers. His most recent work is a book entitled “Principles of Power Integrity for PDN Design” published by Prentice Hall in 2017.

Revisiting the Viterbi Algorithm and Its Early Secrets 🗓

–brief walk through a boom moment in digital communications

IEEE San Diego Section, Communications Chapter
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Meeting Date: November 5, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Keith Kunm
Location: San Diego
Cost: free IEEE members, $5 non-IEEE members
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
It’s been just over 50 years since A. J. Viterbi published his famous algorithm for decoding convolutional codes. While the Viterbi Algorithm’s core, best state or ACS, is well known, the need for tracing back in a code trellis is less so. His paper highlighted the role of block length in exploiting the then state-of-art bounds on error probability, and his novel method remains optimal in single-pass, maximum likelihood decoding and several other problem areas. Trace back was IP secretive in those early days. Yet it was the key to reaching the potential of both the codes and the algorithm. In honor of Viterbi’s many contributions, this talk revisits the VA, covering the insight of trace back as well, in theory and implementation. No prior experience in trellises and the VA is needed to appreciate this brief walk through a boom moment in digital communications that still reverberates today.

Bio:
Keith Kunm (COMSOC M ’76) holds a BSEE from Arizona State University and MS from Stanford University. He worked at LInkabit in the 1970s for two of the earliest practical coding experts, Jerry Heller and Andy Viterbi, mainly in sequential decoding, troposcatter, packet radio and LSI codecs, and SSMA. He then worked a few years in CVTs for electric cars, but it was way too early. So he returned to digital communications for the next 35 years, lastly on US Navy’s Mobile User Objective System SATCOM. Chasing SBIRs from time to time, these days, as AI7SI, he is working on amateur radio SDR, full circle back to his beginnings as a ham in 1964.

IEEE OC YP – November Boba Night 🗓

— grow your network with tasty boba tea and delicious appetizers!

IEEE OC Young Professionals
Meeting Date: Tuesday, November 5, 2018
Time:
6:30 – 7:00: Boba
7:00 – 7:30 Appetizers
7:30 – 9:00: Networking

Location: Irvine – Address is for Le Diplomate Cafe but we don’t meet inside due to space restrictions, come look for us at the tables under the white canopy across the cafe!
Cost: Free boba for IEEE members and self paid for non IEEE members.
RSVP: Just show up
Event Details: IEEE events

Summary:
Meet new friends and grow your network with tasty boba tea and delicious appetizers! We meet at the tables under the white canopy at University Town Center by UC Irvine. Whether you’re an EECS student looking to meet professionals, a young professional looking to grow their network or general IEEE member in the area, we’ll have something for you, even if you don’t like boba!

Awesome Photons – A Fiber Optic Technology Update 🗓

–a look at the current status of fiber optic technology

IEEE Central Coast Section, Co-sponsored by ASME Channel Islands
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Meeting Date: December 18, 2019
Time:
6:00 PM – Hors d’oeuvres
6:25 PM – Banquet Dinner
6:40 PM – Fiber Optics Presentation

Speaker: Dennis Horwitz of American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Location: Santa Barbara, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Fiber optics has revolutionized the world of communications since its commercial inception nearly 4 decades ago. In 1970, Corning Glass researchers Robert Maurer, Donald Keck, and Peter Schultz invented fiber optic wire or “Optical Waveguide Fibers” (patent #3,711,262) capable of carrying 65,000 times more information than copper wire. This wire allowed for information carried by a pattern of light waves to be decoded at a destination even a thousand miles away. Then in 1977, the first optical telephone communication system was installed about 1.5 miles under downtown Chicago. Each optical fiber carried the equivalent of 672 voice channels. Today, the Los Angeles-to-Hong Kong Pacific Light Cable Network spans 13,000+ km of ocean between Los Angeles to Hong Kong supporting 144 Tb/s or the equivalent 2.25 billion voice channels.

Fiber optics is more than pushing high speed data over long distances but the technology has been used to create unique sensors that have enabled many new applications and enhanced capabilities. Lesser known is how fiber optic technology is being applied in manufacturing, energy, aerospace, transportation, medicine, infrastructure, consumer goods and art.

In this presentation, we will explain how fiber optics works as well as take a look at the current status of fiber optic technology and its many usual and unusual applications. A strand of glass fiber – or even that of plastic – has more uses than meets the eye. But, it all comes down to how this unique medium conducts light in so many different ways.

Bio:
Dennis Horwitz received his B.S.E.E. and M.S.E.E. degrees from the University of California at Los Angles and has more than 40 years’ experience in fiber optic research and development, product development, standards development, sales, and marketing of fiber optic test equipment, sensors and components. He was co-founder of two successful start-ups in fiber optic test and measurement: Photodyne Inc. (1979–1990) and Rifocs Corp. (1990–2003). He is currently co-founder and Vice President of Sales & Marketing for Micronor Inc., (2003 to present) a manufacturer and distributor of fiber optic kinetic sensors for medical and industrial applications. Dennis is also ASME Channel Islands Vice Chair.

Using Photonics to Make More Energy Efficient Data Centers & Communications 🗓

— using quantum dot (QD) lasers and integration on silicon

IEEE Central Coast Section
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Meeting Date: November20, 2019
Time:
6:00 PM – Complimentary Pizza, Salad, Beverage
6:25 PM – Central Coast Status
6:30 PM – Professor Bowers’ Presentation

Speaker: Professor John Bowers Ph.D. – UCSB ECE
Location: Goleta, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Photonics can reduce energy consumption in information processing and communications while simultaneously increasing the interconnect bandwidth density. The energy consumption in data centers is shifting from logic operations to interconnect energies. Without the prospect of substantial reduction in energy per bit communicated, the exponential growth of our use of information is limited. The use of optical interconnects fundamentally addresses both interconnect energy and bandwidth density, and is the only scalable solution to this problem. With the use of photonic integration and fiber optics, and the elimination of electrical line charging dissipation, we can save power by transmitting data from 1 mm to 1 km with the same energy (20 fJ/bit) and simplicity as local electrical wires on chip. A focus of our research is on using quantum dot (QD) lasers and integration on silicon for lower threshold and higher efficiency sources, higher temperature operation, isolator free operation, and superior mode locking capability. A recent example includes a 4.1 Tbps, 60 wavelength, 32 Gbaud PAM-4 transmitter using a single mode locked quantum dot laser.

Bio:
John Bowers is Director of the Institute for Energy Efficiency and a professor in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research interests are primarily concerned with silicon photonics, optoelectronic devices, optical switching and transparent optical networks and quantum dot lasers. Bowers received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University and then worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories before joining UCSB. Bowers is a fellow of the IEEE, OSA and the American Physical Society, and a recipient of the IEEE Photonics Award, OSA/IEEE Tyndall Award, the IEEE LEOS William Streifer Award and the South Coast Business and Technology Entrepreneur of the Year Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Inventors.

California Consumer Privacy Act – What It Means for You 🗓

— learn about some of the best practices for data protection

IEEE Buenaventura Section
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Meeting Date: November 6, 2019
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dhruv Pandya
Location: Thousand Oaks
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
m locks on filing cabinets and safety deposit boxes in banks, privacy has been of paramount importance to modern man. In our digitized world, where everything from banking to grocery shopping happens digitally, the importance of data privacy is more evident than ever.

The concept of data privacy involves personal data such as personally identifiable information (PII) and personal health information (PHI) which can include Social Security numbers, health, and medical records, financial data, including bank account and credit card numbers, and even basic (but still sensitive) information, such as full names, addresses, and birthdates.

To ensure data privacy, the European Union has pioneered and enacted multiple data-protection directives. With the revised General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the European Union has become the focal point of the global dialogue on individual data privacy. As for the United States, a ballot initiative began in California in 2018 to gain more data privacy and protection for California citizens. This led to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) being enacted on June 28, 2018. This law comes in effect from January 2020 and the enforcement will begin in July 2020. We will learn about the general information on CCPA, who needs to comply, what data it covers. We will also learn about some of the best practices for data encryption and protection.

Bio:
Dhruv Pandya is an information security specialist at a leading market research firm. He holds a master’s degree in computer science and a Bachelor of Engineering in Computer Engineering. He believes that learning is a perennial process. His master’s thesis included a research contribution to the SoCal High Technology Task Force. As a computer engineer and a budding computer scientist, Dhruv has a strong background in Information Security, Digital Forensics, Compliance Frameworks, and Cryptography.

IEEE OC Section ExCom Meeting 🗓

— All are invited

IEEE OC Section
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Meeting Date: Nov 14, 2019
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:30 PM Meet

Location: Irvine
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
IEEE Orange County Section Executive Committee Monthly meeting – occurs every 2nd thursday of the month.

All IEEE OC Committee/Chapter/Affinity/SIG Chair/Key Volunteers (or their proxy) are requested to attend. Other IEEE members are also welcome to attend. Please RVSP here to ensure adequate food is ordered. Routine attendance is required to qualify for your chapter annual IEEE rebate.

IEEE Brain Data Bank Challenge 🗓

— Deadline for submitting the IEEE BDB Challenge registration form is December 3, 2019.

The IEEE Brain Initiative is partnering with the IEEE
BigData 2019
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Meeting Date: December 19, 2019

Location: Los Angeles
Cost: IEEE BigData 2019 participants
can attend the BDB Challenge free. Other participants require minimally one-day conference registration at IEEE
BigData 2019.
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: Event

Summary:
The 2019 IEEE BDB
Challenge, part of the IEEE BigData Cup Challenges,
will help advance multi-disciplinary research and
development, and seeks to address questions
associated with EEG signal image data processing
and analytics. Register for the Challenge and
creatively demonstrate value proposition based on
your selected open source multi-modal brain data.
Cash Awards to Top Winners.