“Earth, Air, Fire & Water: Monitoring Natural Hazards in California” 🗓

Metro LA IEEE GRSS Panel Discussion Event
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Meeting Date: May 10, 2018
Time: 5:00 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Panel
Location: Azusa, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools
Summary:
Southern California experiences its fair share of exposure to risks from natural hazards, e.g. wildfires, debris flows, and earthquakes. Geosciences and remote sensing applications continue to increase our understanding and help to mitigate these risks. This panel event brings together a few local southern California players involved in both advancing deployment of satellite and airborne capabilities and information technology as well their use in everyday and emergency operations

Panel Members :
1. Tom Pagano (JPL, instrument engineer primarily, NOAA architecture trade, CIRSS)
2. Mark Jackson (NWS-LOX MIC very busy today!)
3.Susan Owen (JPL, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Deputy Section Manager, ARIA

Emergency Power Systems – Bringing Diesel Engines into Compliance with Local Air Quality Permit Requirements 🗓

IEEE Metropolitan Los Angeles Section
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Meeting Date: May 9, 2018
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:30 PM Presentation
Speaker: Greg Korst the Western Regional Business Manager for Rypos
Location: Los Angeles, California
Cost:
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools
Summary:
Since the United States passed the Federal Clean Air Act in 1972, many rules and regulations governing all sources of pollutants have been implemented. As usual, California leads the way, with the Los Angeles area having the toughest requirements in the States. Large diesel engines at the Tier 2 or Tier 3 level have reduced emissions about as far as possible on their own, and now require the use of Exhaust Aftertreatment devices to comply with the more stringent AQMD requirements established in California’s metropolitan areas.
Topics:
•Revised Regulations from CARB
•Local AQMD Rules
•What’s required to comply, and get permitted by AQMD
•Available technologies in the Market for compliance
•How these technologies affect facilities & operations
•Open discussion, Q & A

Bio: Greg Korst is the Western Regional Business Manager for Rypos, developer and manufacturer of the Active Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF). With 10 years of experience from San Diego to Anchorage, he’s been instrumental in bringing Data Centers, Hospitals, Airports and other large facilities’ diesel emissions into compliance with their specific local AQMD regulations.

Greg holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Lehigh University, and is a member of ASME, IEEE, EGSA & 7×24 Exchange.

Antenna and RF Shielding Fundamentals Workshop 🗓

CLAS EMC Chapter
Co-sponsored by CLAS MTT Society and AP Society Chapters, plus Orange County EMC Society Chapter
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Meeting Date: June 1, 2018
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Robert Scully
Location: El Segundo, California
Cost: none, This is a FREE workshop that begins with a complimentary lunch. All IEEE members and guests are welcome to attend, but advance registration is required to ensure adequate seating and catering.
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools
Summary:
TECHNICAL PROGRAM:
Antenna Factor – A Deceptively Simple Parameter – Abstract: Antennas used for EMI measurements are employed as transducers that convert field strength to antenna terminal voltage. While the concept is quite simple, the reality is that antenna factors are affected by a great many characteristics of the measurement setup, including the presence or absence of a reflective “ground” plane, the height of the antenna above the ground or chamber floor, the type of antenna, the uniformity of the field being measured, the distance between the antenna used for measurement and the source being measured, and the impedance match between the antenna and its load. This presentation will provide a basic definition of receive and transmit antenna factors, and discuss some of the setup characteristics that may affect them.

Shielding Fundamentals – Abstract: Various approaches have been employed over time to describe electromagnetic shielding and its effectivity, but perhaps the most well known relies heavily on theoretical development by S. Schelkunoff. Developed based on impedance relationships at interfaces, observed and/or expected behavior can be described using simple equations. Related discussions focus on engineering aspects of shielding including design and magnetic effects.

Bio: Dr. Robert Scully Dr. Robert Scully holds a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Arlington in Electrical Engineering with strong emphasis in electromagnetics. He is an IEEE Fellow, a registered Professional Engineer in the state of Texas, a licensed commercial (PG-12-27194) and amateur (N9RCS) radio operator, holds various Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) certifications from the University of Missouri-Rolla (now Missouri University of Science and Technology) and iNARTE, and is a member of Tau Beta Pi and Eta Kappa Nu. Dr. Scully holds a Federal GS15 rating, and is the Johnson Space Center Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Group Lead Engineer, serving as the technical lead for EMC at the Center. He is also the lead for the Community of Practice for EMC within the Agency. Dr. Scully supports NASA’s major programs including the International Space Station, the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, and the Commercial Crew Development Program, providing expertise and guidance in development of tailored electromagnetic compatibility specifications, including control plans, interference control testing methodologies, ESD control, and lightning protection and test. Dr. Scully has been active in the IEEE EMC Society for over 20 years and is a Past President of the Society. He was Vice President of Technical Services for multiple terms, and previously served in all Officer Positions for the Technical Activities Committee, Technical Committee 1, and Technical Committee 4. He is the currently the Chair of the Education Committee, and is the founder and Chair of the Galveston-Houston EMC Society Chapter.

The Things We Ought to Know About MIMO: Most Important – It is a Game Changer 🗓

— IEEE Distinguished Lecture Series

CSULB Systems Council Chapter
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Meeting Date: May 1, 2018
Time: 4:00 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Dr. Bernard Sklar
Location: Long Beach
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
In 1948 Shannon taught us about the fundamental tools for communication systems, namely, power and bandwidth (BW). It didn’t take us long to realize that BW is the more valuable of the two. We have to buy it or lease it. It is finite and scarce. While other novel techniques (spread spectrum and OFDM) teach us how to share our resources, with MIMO we can do more. We can effectively create new resources. One can never literally create new spectrum, but because MIMO systems can yield such incredible increases in capacity, we can think of it as doing just that. Because MIMO represents such a major technological innovation, one can predict that some form of MIMO will always be included in future specifications of wireless systems.

Bio: Dr. Bernard Sklar has over 60 years of technical experience at: Republic Aviation, Hughes Aircraft, Litton Industries, and The Aerospace Corp. At Aerospace, he helped develop the MILSTAR satellite system, and was the principal architect for EHF Satellite Data Link Standards. Currently, he is Head of Advanced Systems at Communications Engineering Services, a consulting company he founded in 1984. He has taught engineering courses at several universities, including the UCLA and the University of Southern California, and has presented numerous training programs throughout the world. Dr. Sklar has published and presented scores of technical papers. He is the recipient of the 1984 Prize Paper Award from the IEEE Communications Society for his tutorial series on digital communications, and he is the author of the book, Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applications, 2nd Edition, Prentice-Hall, 2001. He is past Chair of the Los Angeles Council IEEE Education Committee. He holds a Ph.D. degree in engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Studying Earthquake Faults: From the Sky and with Boots on the Ground 🗓

IEEE CLAS Life Members Affinity Group
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Meeting Date: June 16, 2018
Time: 10AM – 12 Noon
Speaker: Andrea Donnellan of Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Location: Rolling Hills Estate, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools
Summary:
California’s earthquake faults take up the motion of the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. Tectonic deformation of the Earth’s crust can be measured using the Global Positioning System (GPS), differenced radar images, and topography measured from small UAVs (drones). Combining the measurements with computational models makes it possible to understand past earthquakes and current earthquake fault behavior. The measurements show triggered slip on networks of faults in southern California following moderate to large earthquakes. A significant portion of the slip is aseismic, which would reduce the earthquake hazard. Analysis of regional crustal deformation shows a bifurcating plate boundary with two branches that extend from the Gulf of California and follow the San Andreas fault system, and Eastern California Shear Zone. The analysis also can be used to rank relative activity between fault systems.

Bio: Andrea Donnellan is a principal research scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Andrea Donnellan studies how earthquakes and plate tectonics relate by integrating observations from space, aircraft, small drones, and computational modeling. She has conducted field studies in California, Antarctica, the Altiplano of Bolivia, Mongolia, and Variegated Glacier in Alaska. Andrea Donnellan received a B.S. in geology from the Ohio State University in 1986, a master’s and Ph.D. in geophysics from Caltech in 1988 and 1991 respectively, and an M.S. in Computer Science from the University of Southern California in 2003. She has won the Presidential Early Career Award, NASA’s Software of the Year Award, the MUSES of the California Science Center Woman of the Year Award, and Women in Aerospace Award for Outstanding Achievement. The Donnellan Glacier in Antarctica is named in honor of her work on that continent. She is an instrument rated commercial land and sea pilot, an FAA and NASA certified small UAS pilot, and a certified scuba diver.

Putting the “Data” into “Big Data” 🗓

— The presentation draws on experiences from web analytics, systems logs, business informatics, telemetry, biological signals and more to define and organize data sets that are useful, clear, and durable in a simple, practicable way.

Buenaventura Section
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Meeting Date: May 9, 2018
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Karl Geiger
Location: Thousand Oaks, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools
Summary:
Pity the poor data scientists. Much of the raw input they see is data exhaust from one process or another. From data smog they conjure, through the magic of various algorithms, critical insights into business operations, demographics, market trends, and operations. But what happens if the data are bad or sketchy, wrong or misunderstood? The resulting algorithmic output is still “true”, leading to a phenomenon known as garbage in, gospel out. Algorithms may be fads, but data are forever. “Forever data” clear, easy to understand, well-defined, well-organized, easy to use are what data scientists need to ensure good results while keeping a full head of hair. The presentation draws on experiences from web analytics, systems logs, business informatics, telemetry, biological signals and more to define and organize data sets that are useful, clear, and durable in a simple, practicable way.
Bio:
Karl Geiger has been one of the most impactful Section Chairs of the Buenaventura Section and very active with IEEE from 2009 to 2013, and chaired the IEEE Los Angeles Council from 2012-2013. He retired in 2009 to work pro-bono full time with the IEEE, local start-up companies Cure Pharmaceutical, InClinical, MCI START, lectured at local colleges, supported the Moorpark College Engineering Club, Ventura County schools competitions and the national champion Moorpark High School Academic Decathlon team in which his three children competed state-wide and nationally.

Karl founded Convergent Informatics, Inc., with three Amgen colleagues in 2008. Customers included biotech companies such as Kythera Biopharmaceuticals, an eCommerce businesses, and other start-up businesses along the 101 corridor in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties. Karl also worked with the local venture communities, reviewed pitches and coached entrepreneurs. Prior to Convergent, Karl was the Director of Enterprise Architecture at Amgen, Inc., where his teams designed and documented several enterprise-class information systems. From 2013-2015 he was chief architect at Neural ID in Redwood City, CA, more recently product manager at NovaStor in Agoura, CA, and is currently retired again.

PLL’s and Phase Noise Modeling in Verilog 🗓

— the tool of choice for modeling and studying PLL’s and is plain “digital” Verilog

BUENAVENTURA ED/CAS CHAPTER
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Meeting Date: May 22, 2018
Time: 6:30 PM Networking & Food; 7:00 PM Presentation
Speaker: Greg Warwar, Teledyne
Location: Newbury Park, California
Cost: none
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Verilog is the accepted language of choice for modeling and simulating digital designs. For analog blocks the tool choice is a low level circuit simulator like HSPICE or Spectre. For PLL’s a common misconception is that you can use Verilog to model a PLL if you don’t care about accuracy, but if you do care about precision, you’ll need an analog circuit simulator like HSPICE or Spectre. Various options like Verilog-A and Verilog-AMS are attempts to achieve the best of both worlds, but in this talk, we propose that the tool of choice for modeling and studying PLL’s and is plain “digital” Verilog. It’s the right tool, but almost always used the wrong way for modeling PLL’s. Understanding how the underlying simulation engine in Verilog works enables us to set up our models in a very precise, yet very simple manner. The efficiency and speed of Verilog allows us to literally watch our PLL designs come alive in the time domain with timing accuracy that can’t be achieved in an analog circuit simulator. Watching designs operate in the time domain crystalizes our understanding of them, and enables us to study and quantify transient and other non-linear phenomena.

Bio:
Greg Warwar received a master’s degree in electrical engineering from Rice University in 1989. Following graduation, he joined Texas Instruments in Dallas, TX as a member of the technical staff where he worked on ΣΔ analog to digital converters for precision audio applications. In 1992, he joined Vitesse Semiconductor in Camarillo, CA where he worked for 23 years on high speed serial communications IC’s, focusing on many areas of analog and mixed-signal design including VCO’s, phase locked loops, clock recovery, frequency synthesizers, and adaptive equalization. Since 2015, Greg has been a principal engineer in the mixed-signal ASICs design group at Teradyne, Inc. in Agoura Hills, CA. Greg holds six U.S. patents in the area of CMOS mixed-signal IC design.

Full duplex, low power systems, for high throughput communication and computing platforms 🗓

— Full-duplex transmission promises to double spectral efficiency.

IEEE ComSig Chapter of Orange County

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Meeting Date: May 1, 2018
Time: 6:00PM Social; 6:30 PM Networking & Dinner; 7:15 PM Presentation
Speaker: Prof. Ahmed M. Eltawil, UCI of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The Henry Samueli School of Engineering University of California, Irvine
Location: Santa Ana
Cost: First 10 early-birds (first-come-first-serve) are free! After that, $20 for non-members with dinner, $10 for IEEE members with dinner, $5 for student-members with dinner, free for presentation only
RSVP: requested, through website
Event Details: IEEE vTools

Summary:
Enabling the 5G vision of a wirelessly interconnected ecosystem requires innovation and optimization at all levels of the hierarchy. In this talk, we first consider the system from a link enhancement perspective, where we present recent results directed at enabling Full-duplex communications. Currently systems operate in “Half duplex mode” to avoid self-saturation, where the high-powered transmitter saturates the receive path. Full-duplex transmission promises to double the spectral efficiency by allowing bidirectional communications to be carried out over the same resources. The key challenge in practical full-duplex systems is the un-cancelled self-interference power caused by a combination of hardware imperfections. We discuss recent work that identifies system limitations, performance, optimizations, and the practicality of proposed architectures.

In the second part of the talk, we consider the Achilles heel of wireless systems, namely, power consumption. Traditionally, reliability is attributed to higher power consumption. We show that this is not necessarily true. In fact, one can design systems to be both reliable (within desired specifications) and low power. We present a unique approach for power management which factors in the built-in algorithmic resilience to errors inherent in all wireless designs. This error tolerance can be utilized and co-designed with the hardware circuitry in mind to provide resilience not only to channel induced errors but also to hardware induced faults (due to low power modes), thus expanding the adaptation space to unexplored domains.

Bio: Ahmed M. Eltawil is a Professor at the University of California, Irvine. He has been with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science since 2005 where he is the founder and director of the Wireless Systems and Circuits Laboratory. His current research interests are in the general area of low power digital circuit and signal processing architectures with an emphasis on mobile systems. In addition to his department affiliation, he is also affiliated to a number of research centers across the University of California, Irvine. He received the Doctorate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2003 and the M.Sc. and B.Sc. degrees (with honors) from Cairo University, Giza, Egypt, in 1999 and 1997, respectively. Dr. Eltawil has been on the technical program committees and steering committees for numerous workshops, symposia, and conferences in the areas of low power computing and wireless communication system design. He received several awards, as well as distinguished grants, including the NSF CAREER grant in 2010 supporting his research in low power systems.

SWE-OC Professional Development Conference: You Have Arrived! 🗓

Learn about the skills needed to succeed in the work place and take your career to the next level

OC Society of Women Engineers
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Meeting Date: April 21, 2018
Time: 8AM – 3:30PM
Speaker: Keynote by Kim O’Rourke
Four Speakers and a Panel
Location: Anaheim
Cost: $25 – $45
RSVP: requested
Event Details: Eventbrite
Summary:
The Society of Women Engineers Orange County (SWE-OC) Section is hosting their annual Professional Development Conference (PDC), to be held Saturday, April 21, 2018. Whether you are a seasoned professional, seeking new opportunities, just entering the job market, or an ambitious student, You Have Arrived! PDC offers attendees the skills needed to succeed in the work place and take their careers to the next level.
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NEC 240.67 Arcflash Prevention and Mitigation 🗓

— An overview of Arc Energy Reduction Methods

IEEE PES/IAS Joint Chapter – OC Section

Meeting Date: April 19, 2018
Time: 6:00 PM Networking & Food; 6:45 PM Dinner; 7:45 PM Presentation
Speaker: John Jansen, P.E
Location: The Doubletree Club Orange County Airport

Meal: $30 (plus 2.75% for major credit cards); FREE for full-time college students with I.D.
PLEASE RESERVE BY CONTACTING WILLIAM (BILL) STONE AT:
William.Stone@polb.com or (562) 708-5644 (cell)
Please specify a dinner entree: Chicken, Fish, or Vegetarian
Drawing for FREE DINNER at end of meeting (valid at a future meeting, within one year of winning).
Summary: An overview of Arc Energy Reduction Methods as outlined in NEC 2014 section 240.87 and introducing the Current Limiting Arc Flash Quenching System, a new approach to arc resistance. This presentation was done last month at the 2018 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop in Fort Worth Texas.

Bio: Mr. Jansen is an Application Engineer of electrical distribution equipment in Southern California for Eaton Corporation. Mr. Jansen has 38 years of experience working in a variety of field service, engineering and management roles with Westinghouse Electric and Eaton Corporation.